AACN News—August 2001—Association News

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Vol. 18, No. 8, AUGUST 2001


Make Waves: NTI Speech Available on Video and in Print

If you missed the inspiring address delivered by immediate past President Denise Thornby, RN, MS, at NTI 2001, you can still enjoy it—in three formats:


• Printed copy—free (Item #6100)
• 13-minute highlights video—$5.95 for shipping and handling (Item #6100HV)
• 50-minute complete video—$5.95 for shipping and handling (Item #6100V)

To order, call (800) 899-2226. You can also download the printed version from the "About AACN" area of the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org.

Activities Spotlight Critical Care: Annual Celebration Takes on Different Forms

Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month was celebrated in a variety of ways throughout the country in May 2001. The annual observance spotlights the collaborative contributions of nurses, physicians and other healthcare providers to the care of
critically ill patients.

From individual units to hospitalwide and chapter events, critical care nurses have found innovative ways to increase awareness of critical illness, critical care nursing and the benefits that interdisciplinary partnerships bring to their communities.

“Critical Care—Partners in Healing” was the theme of this year’s celebration, which was sponsored by the Foundation for Critical Care. AACN was again
a strategic partner in sponsoring this annual event.

Atlanta Area Chapter President
Kathy Graham (left) presented
certified nurse recognition plaque to
President-elect Nancy King, who
accepted on behalf of DeKalb Medical Center.


In Georgia
The Atlanta Area Chapter of AACN undertook a project that spotlighted certified nurses.

Plaques on which the names of CCRN-certified nurses could be engraved for display were presented to hospitals in the area. Although these hospitals were recognizing their certified nurses in different ways, the plaques provided a consistent way to promote to other staff and visitors the nurse’s achievement toward excellence in the delivery of care.

Each plaque was inscribed with the chapter logo and the words “[hospital name] recognizes the following CCRNs for their dedication to excellence.”


Gina Barnes (center) displays the award she received from the Louisiana Organ
Procurement Agency in recognition of her efforts in working with donor and recipient families.


In Louisiana
Lake Charles Memorial Hospital, a “mini-NTI” focused attention on the critical care unit, where awareness and education were promoted and 10 sales representative displayed products applicable to critical care. In addition, door prizes included nine AACN memberships that were donated by physicians who practice in the unit.

The Louisiana Organ Procurement Agency also used the occasion to honor one of the nurses, Gina Barnes, RN, for her dedication and hard work in facilitating several organ procurement cases. One of the donor families with which Barnes had worked, as well as a recipient family were present for the presentation of the agency’s “Commitment to Donation Award” to Barnes.
“Our Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Day was truly a success,” said Cynthia G. Cox, RN, CCRN, FNP. “We plan to make this special day for our nurses an annual event.”


AACN Membership Meeting a Forum for Information, Dialogue

Open dialogue is an important part of AACN’s Annual Meeting and Forum, where members have the opportunity to hear about association initiatives from national board members, the national office team and volunteer groups regarding the work they have completed during the fiscal year. Members are encouraged to submit questions in advance or to ask questions from the floor during the meeting. Following is a summary of the questions that were posed at the 2001 Annual Meeting and Forum on May 22 in Anaheim, Calif.

QWhy does AACN’s position statement on staffing seem so vague? When is AACN going to take a firm stand?

AAACN’s position statement, titled “Maintaining Patient-Focused Care in an Environment of Nursing Staff Shortages and Financial Constraints,” firmly states the association’s stance that staffing must be driven by patient needs in the environment in which care is provided. It is based on an unwavering belief that adequate and safe staffing is imperative and can be determined only by considering patient’s needs and matching these with the nurse’s competencies.

The reason AACN does not advocate for mandatory or set nurse-to-patient staffing ratios is important to address. AACN recognizes why nurses are calling for set staffing ratios and, as reported by scores of members, that staffing is consistently inadequate in many hospitals across the country. This situation is unacceptable and the association has been firm in making its voice heard and taking actions to bring awareness to these situations and to promote collaborative solutions.

AACN’s concern is that advocating for a mandated staffing ratio carries a strong potential for making this ratio a ceiling instead of a minimum for staffing, leaving little or no flexibility to base staffing on patient needs. Because the needs of critically ill patients can change minute to minute, ICU staffing must be able to accommodate a 1-to-1 or even a 2-to-1 nurse-to-patient ratio when the condition of a patient dramatically shifts. Mandated ratios do not factor in consideration of what patients need or other variables, such as the experience level of nurses or the availability of support services.

AACN believes that the work environment in a critical care unit is constantly changing and that the needs of critically ill patients are too unpredictable for set staffing ratios to be a safe solution. Instead, AACN members must continue to insist on staffing that effectively meets the needs of the individual patients cared for in their units. AACN promotes a more predictable model of determining staffing, such as an acuity/classification system that allows for flexibility in addressing factors of nurses’ experience and systems issues.

QWhat is AACN doing to help overcome the nursing shortage?

AAACN recognizes that the growing nursing shortage is perhaps the most pressing issue facing the profession today and that its impact extends beyond nursing to all of healthcare and the community at large. In response, AACN has undertaken several initiatives to address the shortage issue:
• Advocating for increased nursing education funding
• Supporting the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which proposes loan repayment assistance for nursing school costs for time served in shortage areas
• Collaborating to develop a national advertising campaign to promote nursing and recruitment
• Launching the comprehensive, multiyear Value of Nursing initiative to increase recognition for the nursing profession and heighten the importance of professional development.
• Participating and providing leadership in the “Call to the Nursing Profession,” a summit of the nursing community to develop and implement a comprehensive, long-term plan to address nurse staffing and the nursing shortage.

QIs AACN doing anything to increase the critical care curriculum for students in nursing school?

AAACN has identified education as one of its strategic objectives for the year and is actively continuing dialogue with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing about enriching this curriculum. In addition, AACN has partnered with the School of Nursing at Indiana University, Indianapolis, to develop and pilot a virtual classroom centered on AACN’s critical care orientation program.

QHas AACN considered recognizing nurse managers as advanced practice nurses?

ARecognizing that nurse managers are one of the most important and influential groups in facilitating a positive and professional work environment, AACN convened the Nurse Manager Think Tank for FY02.

To position itself to better serve this group, AACN needed more information and data on their unique needs. How the practice of nurse managers should be
recognized and supported is one of the issues the Nurse Manager Think Tank will address.

QHas AACN ended its relationship with the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) with respect to the acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP) exam? Nurse practitioners (NPs) do not want multiple exams developed. Wouldn’t an exam by another organization conflict with the scope and standards for NPs, which were developed by ANCC?

AAACN Certification Corporation is currently in discussion with ANCC to end its joint venture agreement to administer the ACNP exam and to determine which organization will administer the exam in the future. The decision was based on AACN Certification Corporation’s desire to implement a new vision for its certification programs, based on feedback from certificants and trends in the practice environment.

The scope and standards for ACNPs were jointly developed and published by AACN and the American Nurses Association in 1995. These standards, which provided the framework for the ACNP exam, were based on a jointly conducted job analysis of the practice of ACNPs. There have been no discussions to date about having more than one ACNP exam, and both organizations have committed to ensuring that there is no interruption in the availability of the current ACNP exam.

In addition, the fact that AACN Certification Corporation will not be jointly administering the ACNP exam with ANCC does not mean that AACN and AACN Certification Corporation will no longer collaborate with ANCC and other nursing organizations to advocate and support the role and practice for ACNPs.

QWhat resources does AACN provide to chapters that want to develop Web sites?

AAACN is currently completing a pilot project in which the national association would host chapter Web sites. AACN would also provide training, technical support and design support to the chapters. After the pilot project is evaluated, the program will be made available to other chapters. The program is expected to be available in fall 2001. For more information, contact Member and Chapter Specialist Dennis Maggi at dennis.maggi@aacn.org.

QWhy is the Annual Meeting and Forum scheduled at the same time as chapter enrichment sessions? This makes it difficult for chapter members to attend.

AAACN agrees. Plans to eliminate this inadvertent scheduling conflict, beginning with NTI 2002 in Atlanta, Ga., are already in place

QWhat type of support does AACN offer to members who are in school?

AAACN funds $150,000 of Educational Advancement Scholarships each year to assist members who are completing their BSN or pursuing graduate education. For more about these scholarships, contact Member and Chapter Specialist Lisa Mynes at lisa.mynes@aacn.org.

In addition, the Medline, Cinahl and GenRX databases, which are available to members as part of their annual dues, have proven to be valuable tools for members who are in school.
The databases can be accessed via the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org.

Critical Links

A Message to the Membership

To: All AACN members and Chapters
Subject: AACN Critical Links Member-Get-a-Member Program

By now, we hope you are aware of AACN’s Critical Links Member-Get-A-Member program. The current program, which officially began May 1, 2001, will conclude on April 1, 2002. Top recruiters will be recognized at NTI 2002 in Atlanta, Ga.

Throughout the past year, Denise Thornby, RN, MS, AACN president for 2000-01 addressed you about her theme of “Making Waves: The Courage to Influence Practice.” Her first “President’s Note” column, in the July 2000 issue of AACN News, outlined several acts that were highlighted in the book The Seven Acts of Courage by Robert Staub. Two of them fit right in with this year’s Member-Get-A-Member campaign.

One is “The Courage to Dream.” AACN’s dream is to create a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and families where critical care nurses make their optimal contribution. To accomplish this, AACN needs to become stronger in numbers. As Denise said in her Presidential Address at NTI 2001 “…in our world, numbers talk. Ensuring that we are the largest and loudest voice in specialty nursing is one of the most powerful ways that we can build our wave of change.”

To realize this dream, we need your help, which is where “The Courage to Act” comes in to play. If each of you recruits just one new member this year, AACN will be thousands of members stronger. Imagine the impact we will have. Denise closed her Presidential Address by saying, “… building our authority, leadership, visibility and voice, we can shape the profession we love and share. We can’t depend on others to do the work for us.”

In this new year, 2001-02 President Michael Williams, RN, MSN, CCRN, has invited us on a “Journey of Rediscovery,” saying, “We must look inward to the passion that made us nurses. We must reach out to others, welcoming them and nurturing them along the way and we must commit to using AACN’s vision as the road map of our journey.”

We ask you: Reach out and invite a colleague to become a member of AACN so that we can continue our journey and have numbers that talk and a voice that is heard. Together we can build an environment that is caring to both the patients and to you, the nurse.

Rewards Await Recruiters in Membership Campaign

Rewards already have been reaped in the first month of AACN’s Critical Links Member-Get-A-Member campaign, which was launched in May 2001. In fact, members who have recruited at least one new member have received an AACN pocket reference.

Through the campaign, which ends April 1, 2002, individual and chapter recruiters have the chance to receive additional valuable rewards. All recruiters need to do is make certain that their name and AACN membership number are included on the new members’ application forms.
The top recruiters, both individuals and chapters, will be recognized at AACN’s National Teaching Institute™ and Critical Care Exposition, May 4 through 9, 2002, in Atlanta, Ga.
Following are the rewards that await the top recruiters:

Individual Rewards
The reward for the top individual recruiter overall is $500 or an American Express gift certificate. The top recruiter is also eligible for the first-, second- and third-place prize drawings:
1st Prize—Round-trip tickets for two to anywhere in the continental U.S., including a five-day, four-night hotel stay.
2nd Prize—Round-trip tickets for two to anywhere in the continental U.S.
3rd Prize—Four-days, three-nights hotel accommodations at a Marriott Hotel.
In addition to the pocket reference members receive for recruiting their first new member, recruiting five new members earns them a $25 gift certificate toward the purchase of AACN resources. They receive a $50 AACN gift certificate for recruiting 10 new members.
Each month, members who have recruited at least one new member in the month are also entered into a monthly drawing for a $100 American Express gift certificate.

Chapter Rewards
In addition to a $250 gift certificate toward the purchase of AACN resources, chapters reporting the largest increase in membership numbers or the largest percentage increase will receive special recognition at NTI 2002 in Atlanta, Ga. Each month, chapters that recruit new members are also entered into a drawing for one complimentary registration for NTI 2002.

To obtain Critical Links Member-Get-A-Member recruitment campaign forms, call (800) 899-2226. Request Item #1316. Or, visit the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org and click on “Membership” for campaign information.


Who Recruited New Members During May and June?

Following are the members and chapters participating in the Critical Links Member-Get-A-Member campaign in May and June:

Recruiter

Lillian Aguiree, RN, BSN, CCRN
Tiffany Andrews,
Mamoona Arif, RN, MS
Mary Aust, RN, BSN
Lori Beauregard, RN, ADN
Dean Benner, RN, ADN
Evelyn Bertram, RN, BSN
Nancy Blake, RN, MN, CCRN, CNAA
Anne Brown, RN, BSN
Joyce Brown, RN
Carolyn Carter, RN, ADN, BA
Sasipa Charnchaichujit, RN
Claire Collins, RN, BSN, BS
Mary Conner, RN, ADN, CCRN
Kathleen Corban, RN, BSN, CCRN
Therisa Davis, RN
Marla De Jong, RN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, CEN
Carolyn Fernandez, RN, MSN, CCRN, CEN, CS, ACNP
Myrna Fontillas-Boehm, RN, BSN, BS, CCRN
Carol Fountain, RN, CCRN
Evelyn Goldberg, RN, BSN, MS
Lisa Gregory, RN, BSN
Tracy Grogan, RN, MEd, CCRN
Deedra Harrington, RN
Mary Hendrick, RN, BS, CCRN
Sharon Holcombe, RN, MS, CCRN, CS
Mary Holtschneider, RN, BSN
Lindsay Hyland, RN, BSN, BS, CCRN
John Jeffries, RN, BSN, CCRN
Patricia Jennings, RN, ADN, CCRN
Pameula Johnson, RN, BSN, BA, CCRN
Kelly Knickerbocker, RN
Dawn Kregel, RN
Mary Leffard, RN, BSN, CCRN, CNOR, OCN, CPAN, CNA
Pamela Li, RN
Elizabeth Masters,
Courtney Maxie,
Michael McEvoy, RN, ADN, PhD, CCRN
Elizabeth McGarr, RN, ADN, BA, CCRN
James Mears, RN
Arlene Messina, RN, ADN
Sharon Murff, RN, MSN, CCRN
Hector Murillo, RN, BSN
Paulita Narag, RN, ADN, CCRN
Maribel Nieva, RN, BSN
Donna O’Neill, RN, ADN, CCRN
Maren Ortmeier, RN, BSN
Kelly Pallazza, RN, MSN, CCRN
Hurd Pittman, RN, MSN, CCRN
Suzanne Price, RN, BSN
Carol Reitz-Barlow, RN, DNS, CCRN
Gina Santucci, RN, BSN, CCRN
Ralph Schmidt, RN, MSN, CCRN, CPNP
Lindsey Shank, RN, BSN, CCRN
Amy Shields, RN, BSN, CCRN
Lisa Smith, RN, MSN, BS, CCRN
Mary Stewart, RN, BSN, MBA
Grace Talic, RN, BSN
Kenneth Thompson, RN, ADN
Marjorie Wheeler, RN, MS
Donna Williams, RN, MS, CCRN

Chapters
Atlanta Area Chapter
Greater Birmingham Chapter
Greater Chicago Area Chapter
Heart of Acadiana Chapter
Heart of the Piedmont Chapter
Pacific Crest Regional Chapter
Smoky Hill Chapter

# Recruited

1
1
2
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
8
1
1
5
3
1
4
6
2
2
1
1
1
1
4
1
4
1
5
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
2
5
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
2
1
5
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1


5
2
1
8
3
5
4

May and June Rewards
Congratulations to the reward recipients in our monthly membership campaign drawings for May and June. Each month, one chapter will receive a complimentary registration to NTI 2002 and one individual will receive a $100 American Express gift certificate. The recipients are randomly selected from those who recruited at least one new member.

The recipients in May were:
• Chapter—Heart of the Acadiana Chapter
• Individual—Arlene Messina, RN, ADN
The recipients in June were:
• Chapter—Greater Birmingham Chapter;
• Individual—Therisa Davis, RN

Submit Awards Nominations by Aug. 10

If you haven’t already nominated yourself or a colleague for an AACN Circle of Excellence Award 2002, you may still be able to do so. Simply mail or fax the form below by Aug. 10, 2001, deadline. You can also complete the nomination form online.

The annual recognition program honors individuals who have made a difference in healthcare and the lives of patients and their families. Circle of Excellence award recipients are recognized in a variety of ways. Many will receive complimentary airfare, hotel accommodations and registration to AACN’s National Teaching Institute™ and Critical Care Exposition, scheduled for May 4 through 9, 2002, in Atlanta, Ga.

For information about the awards that are available, visit the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org. Click on “Membership,” then “Awards, Grants, Scholarships.”

Purchase Liability Insurance Online

AACN members can now purchase liability insurance online. Seabury & Smith, administrator of the AACN professional liability program, recently introduced a new Web site http://www.proliability.com to allow members to purchase protection wherever and whenever they choose.

Seabury & Smith and the program underwriter, Chicago Insurance Company, have solid experience working with critical care nurses. The insurance program is specifically tailored to meet the diverse needs of AACN.

Seabury & Smith, which includes the former Maginnis & Associates, is the leading provider of insurance programs for professional health provider organizations representing some 16 million members.


Influencing Practice: Managing Conflict Essential in Today’s Critical Care World

Editor’s Note: The Leadership Development Work Group has identified four skills—dialogue, self-awareness, navigating change and conflict management—as key to the success of leaders at any level and in any venue. Following is the second in a series of articles about these skills and their applicability to the workplace and other settings.

By the Leadership Development Work Group

Conflict is common in the workplace and a challenge to anyone trying to create a cohesive group to achieve positive outcomes. The critical care environment, where tensions are high and a strong sense of urgency often exists, is particularly prone to the potential for conflict. Staff, physicians, managers, and patients and their families often differ in their values, expectations and goals, creating the perfect setting for conflict to occur.

Although some conflict is expected, it often is not. When conflict is unexpected, participants may not have had the opportunity to reflect on the issue. Emotional responses may be high due to the sudden intensity of the moment. Not everyone involved may have made a commitment to work toward a shared solution. There may not be time to identify a mediator or facilitator.

The key skills identified in this article will help to prepare the critical care nurse dealing with conflict—anticipated or not—in an effective manner.

Definition
Conflict management is a process of working through opposing views to reach a common goal.

Key Components
The key skills within conflict management are those that promote controlling emotional responses, seeking understanding, identifying needs and common interests, seeking mutual benefit, and generating solutions and resolutions.

Key Skills and Strategies
1. Controlling emotional responses—a family accuses your colleague of a serious error; a physician confronts you in front of peers about a patient issue; your personal views on life support conflict with those of the attending physician.

Depending on numerous variables, sudden and unexpected conflict elicits responses that run the gamut of emotions. Emotional reactions will always occur and observing and managing responses to these reactions is the key. Some strategies include:
• Recognize that everyone comes into conflict with personal bias.
• Recognize the need to move beyond personal bias for the conflict management to be successful.
• Recognize biases and be open to other perspectives on an issue.
• When possible, take time to identify personal biases before the process starts. Be aware of beliefs and attitudes that can impact the process.
• Keep tuned into feelings and emotional responses throughout the process. looking at the “why” behind these feelings and responses.
• Practice focused listening.
• Depersonalize the situation as much as possible. Attempt to hear others’ perspectives without feeling a personal affront.

2. Seek Understanding—a family insists on continuing aggressive treatment when this goes against your personal value system; a peer snaps at you for something you said in a staff meeting. Taking the time to seek input from others and clarify a situation can be one of the most effective uses of time in managing conflict.
• Listen intently to how others see the issue and integrate their thoughts into your understanding of the issue
• Have conversations that openly explore others’ views and learn about others’ assumptions.
• Explore issues from diverse points of view and seek understanding of others’ perspectives.
• Express your thinking, reasoning and assumptions to others in a way that promotes their understanding.
• When appropriate, express your feelings, beliefs and preferences clearly and assess for understanding on the part of others.

3. Identify needs and common interests –environmental services insists on waxing the floors during a busy weekend shift; staffing office pulls a nurse and an aide in one shift.
Clearly assessing your needs and the needs of others is often difficult in the midst of emotionally charged conflict. The ability to step back and look objectively at the needs of all parties is crucial in identifying common needs and strategies.
• Clearly state what is needed and listen to what others need.
• Attempt to paraphrase or restate with accuracy what others have said about their perspective of an issue and identify related emotions.
• Listen to everyone’s concerns, needs and perspectives and identify common interests and needs.
• Facilitate the group’s ability to find common needs and interests.

4. Seek Mutual Benefits and Generate Solutions—solutions often require compromise. At other times, we must agree to disagree. Additionally, in critical care, we are often challenged to find solutions and compromises that do not jeopardize patient care.
• Collaborate with others on ways to meet shared interests and common goals.
•Generate multiple options after hearing various proposed solutions.
• Weigh the pros and cons of each option, setting aside personal bias and assumptions as much as possible.
• Identify synergistic and creative solutions.
• Collaborate to select the best option.
• When possible, test the solution.

The ability to work toward common goals and collaborate is essential to positive patient outcomes. Developing conflict management skills will greatly enhance critical care nurses’ ability to influence their environment.


Conflict Management Skills Across the Continuum


Novice

Individual bias dominates thoughts

Takes personal affront to opposing views

Has difficulty listening to other’s views

Is unable to clearly state opposing views

Focuses on own needs

Does not seek diverse views

Promotes self interests

Promotes singular solution

Seeks win/lose strategy

Proficient

Moves beyond personal bias

Depersonalizes issues

Listens intently, seeks understanding

Accurately paraphrases opposing views

Seeks understanding of needs of others

Knows value of and promotes collective thought

Helps to identify common interests

Works to generate several solutions, promotes synergy

Seeks win/win strategy


What Is Peace of Mind Worth to You?

How much are you willing to pay for peace of mind? Here’s something you might want to think about. For the price of a cup of coffee each day, you may be able to obtain valuable protection against the high costs of long-term care you could someday need. That’s the kind of care needed on an ongoing basis by people who can no longer perform such ordinary tasks of daily living as bathing and dressing.

Although it’s not something most of us choose to think about, there may come a time when you cannot care for yourself—whether because you have grown old or frail or because you have had an accident or contracted a chronic illness. It could happen years from now; it could happen tomorrow.

At such a time, your expenses for care could be very high. However, if you have chosen long-term care insurance, you will have a plan you can turn to. When you qualify for benefits and complete a waiting period, the AACN Long-Term Care Insurance Plan helps cover long-term care costs in a variety of locations: in your own home, in a nursing home and in other types of care facilities that may be covered. You can receive services from trained nurses, home healthcare aides, therapists and other types of caregivers. Depending on the maximum benefit you choose when you enroll, you could receive benefits up to $456,250 for the covered services you can receive while you are insured.

This coverage can play a significant role in your overall financial security scenario. Just as you set aside money for your children’s education, your retirement and other special goals, you may want to consider the benefits of including long-term care insurance in your plans for several reasons. First, the coverage enables you to choose the type of care and the location that are right for you. Second, you will help protect your savings from the escalating costs of long-term care. Third, and perhaps most important to many of us, you will avoid placing an undue burden on those you love, who could otherwise have to sacrifice time and money to ensure your care.

You will gain other more advantage when you choose long-term care insurance: the sense that you have made the decisions that will affect your future, rather than letting events shape the future for you. Although no one can predict exactly what will happen in the years ahead, knowing that you are prepared is a good feeling—a feeling called peace of mind.

To request your free AACN Long-Term Care Insurance Plan enrollment kit, call John Hancock at (800) 708-0706; TTY, (800) 255-1808.


Public Policy Update

Costs of Shortage
Rising personnel expenses, largely attributable to the growing shortage of nurses, are the most significant long-term problem affecting hospitals and threaten to keep operating margins in check for the foreseeable future, according to a recently released Fitch Market Services report.

“The current nursing shortage is not cyclical, and hospitals will have to fundamentally change the nature of nurses' jobs, retain staff and keep expenses in check in order to be successful,” said Fitch analyst Anil Joseph, who noted that the shortage has been more prevalent in rural areas and large cities than in suburban areas.”

According to the report, there will be a shortage of 1 million nurses by 2010 and 1.5 million by 2020, which will leave staffing 20% short of the projected demand. The shortage is most severe in high-acuity areas, such as ICUs and emergency departments, which require highly skilled, experienced nurses.

The report, titled “Health Care Staffing Shortage,” can be accessed online at http://www.fitchratings.com. Click on “Public Finance.” The report is located in the “Criteria Reports” section under “Health Care'” A copy of the report can also be obtained by contacting Market Services at (800) 853-4824.

In addition, several hospital and healthcare organizations have embarked on an advocacy ad campaign highlighting the shortage of healthcare workers and urging lawmakers to address the problem. One of the first ads, sponsored by the American Hospital Association, the Association of American Medical Colleges, the National Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems, the Veterans Health Administration and the Federation of American Hospitals, appeared in publications serving Capitol Hill. A follow-up ad was scheduled to appear in Washington, D.C., area publications to ask for increased funding to teaching hospitals. A television ad highlighting nursing home staff shortages has already aired. The Coalition to Protect America's Health Care will begin its ad campaign after the congressional Labor Day recess.
Patient’s Rights
A Patient’s Bill of Rights is one of three legislative priorities listed by President Bush for passage before the summer recess, though not the Senate version that was passed last month. In threatening to veto the Senate-passed bill, Bush objected that the version, which would grant broad rights for people to sue their health plans in state courts, is a “lawyers’ bill of rights” that will increase healthcare costs and cause some businesses to drop employee coverage.

Bush has asked Congress to pass and send to him a bill that addresses his concerns for limiting lawsuits. He wants a bill that “encourages quality healthcare without encouraging frivolous lawsuits that will threaten the existence of an important healthcare policy in America.”

As the House of Representatives prepares to take up the bill, there is surprising consensus that it will increase the costs of healthcare. In 2002, companies and their employees can expect higher healthcare costs for the fourth consecutive year. However, supporters of the measure say that the threat of price increases, which they say will be minimal, is outweighed by the need to protect the sick from HMOs that deny necessary care. Opponents of the bill warn of a proliferation of lawsuits and point out that premiums have already been escalating for years because of malpractice suits against doctors. HMOs insist that, faced with added liability, they will be forced to raise premiums.

House Republican leaders predict that the patients' rights bill passed in the Democrat-run Senate will fail in their chamber and that a GOP version is one that President Bush could sign. However, Speaker Dennis Hastert (R-Ill.), said that he and other Republicans would not try to block a vote on a House bill similar to the Senate's. He offered more hope for a GOP plan that “will be much more balanced.” The Republican House bill generally would keep lawsuits in federal courts and cap pain and suffering damages at $500,000. However, in certain circumstances when an insurer continues to deny treatment after a review board approves it, patients could sue in state court.

House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-Texas) urged Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) to compromise and work with the GOP to produce a bill Bush would sign. Daschle said Democrats already have compromised “a good deal” and said he hopes that if Bush will not sign the Senate bill, he would let it become law without his signature. He noted that when Bush was governor of Texas, he allowed much of that state's patients' bill of rights to become law without signing it.

Patient Protections
Newly released survey findings show continued public support for patient protections, including the right to sue health plans. However, that support erodes when people believe that the cost of health insurance might increase or that companies might stop offering health coverage to their workers. The surveys found that the percentage of people reporting problems with their health plans and the urgency the public attaches to congressional action has not changed in recent years.

When asked if they support a Patients' Bill of Rights that includes a range of consumer protections, such as the right to sue their health plans, 85% said they favor such a proposal. Support drops to 60% when people believe the proposal would increase the cost of health insurance premiums. When people believe that companies might stop offering healthcare plans to their workers, support drops to 41%. These findings are from a survey conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation in April 2001.

To view the survey data chart pack and other information on patient protections, visit the Kaiser Family Foundation Web site at http://www.kff.org and click on “Recent Attitudes Toward Patients' Rights and Managed Care.”

Mandatory Overtime
Maine has become the first state to restrict how hospitals manage mandatory overtime, with the signing of legislation by Gov. Angus King. The legislation, LD 1082, Public Law Chapter 401, prevents hospitals from disciplining nurses who refuse to work mandatory overtime. A nurse may be disciplined for refusing mandatory overtime in the case of “unforeseen” emergency situations to ensure patient safety, the law states. In addition, the law requires hospitals to give nurses who work more than 12 consecutive hours a minimum of 10 hours off following the overtime shift. To read the legislation, visit to janus.state.me.us/legis/bills/LD.asp?LD=1082.

In Oregon, Gov. John Kitzhaber has signed into law a bill (H.B. 2800b) that restricts the number of mandatory overtime hours that can be required of registered nurses. Both the Oregon Hospital Association and the Oregon Nurses Association have agreed to the bill.

The new law requires hospitals to develop staffing plans for nursing services that include a list of qualified on-call nurses as replacement workers on a regular basis. The law limits the hours of mandatory overtime that can be required of RNs to two hours beyond their regular shift and no more than 16 hours in a 24-hour period, and includes exceptions to the overtime limits for emergencies and for rural hospitals with limited replacement staff available. The law applies only to acute inpatient care facilities and dialysis centers. To read the legislation, visit http://www.leg.state.or.us/01reg/measures/hb2800.dir/hb2800.b.html.

Workplace Injuries
A series of public hearings into work-related injuries is Labor Secretary Elaine Chao’s first step toward pursuing a Bush administration policy that protects workers from ergonomics-related injuries through employer cooperation.

Chao began hearings in July 2001 in Washington, D.C., Chicago and California, with a goal of developing a universal definition of injuries caused by repetitive motion and stress. The hearings are intended to develop consensus on how the injuries occur and establish the federal government’s role in identifying such injuries.

Critics have complained that there is not enough scientific evidence to justify employer regulations that were issued late in the Clinton administration, but repealed in March 2001 by the Republican-controlled congress with the understanding that the administration would address the issue.

The hearings will help Chao to fulfill a pledge to conduct a “comprehensive review” of the issue. President Bush signed a repeal of the regulations passed by Congress after a bitter legislative fight that pitted business against organized labor.

The administration’s silence has prompted action on Capitol Hill. Over the objections of the White House and Labor Department, bills have been introduced that would require the agency’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration to issue a final rule within two years. Opponents complained that compliance with the OSHA rules issued late in the Clinton administration was difficult because the rules were too costly and broad. Businesses estimated the price tag at $100 billion, though the government put the cost much lower.

Nurse Supervisors
By a 5-4 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that nurses who perform even the most basic supervisory functions are ineligible to join unions, because they aren’t protected by the National Labor Relations Act. The 66-year-old law allows non-supervisory employees to collectively bargain with their employers.

In its ruling, the high court determined that nurses use independent judgment and act as supervisors even when they call only on professional or technical training-not hierarchical authority-to direct the activities of other employees.

The National Labor Relations Act defines a supervisor as anyone who acts in the interest of the employer and has the authority to make decisions relative to hiring, promoting, discharging, rewarding or disciplining employees. Supervisory activities, the law says, must “not (be) of a merely routine or clerical nature, but require the use of independent judgment.’”

In another case in the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans, nurses and individuals were granted the right to file whistleblower fraud lawsuits on behalf of the federal government, regardless of whether they were personally injured by the alleged fraud. The court’s decision is a major victory for whistle-blowing plaintiffs and a major defeat for institutional healthcare providers.

The disparate rulings are indicative of the growing rift between cost-conscious healthcare employers and an increasingly dissatisfied nursing workforce.

Patient Privacy
The Department of Health and Human Services released its first guidance document on implementation of HIPAA privacy regulations. The 57-page document, “Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information,” seeks to clarify key provisions of the privacy standards published last December. Among other things, the guidance provides advice on implementing HIPAA privacy provisions on the minimum necessary use and disclosure of information. Other sections address oral communications, business associate agreements, regulations regarding minors, communications and marketing, research, and, government access to health information. The department said it plans to release additional guidance materials to help health care providers and insurers comply with the regulations that went into effect in April.

The guidance document is available online at the HHS Office for Civil Rights Web site, http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/hipaa

HCFA Name Change
The Department of Health and Human Services agency that runs Medicare and Medicaid is no longer the Health Care Financing Administration, The name has been changed to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. At a news conference in Washington, D.C., HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson said the new name reflects a “new culture of responsiveness” at the agency.

He outlined a reorganization of the agency, to be called CMS, with three new centers of service. The Center for Beneficiary Choices will focus on the Medicare+Choice program and provide beneficiaries with information they need to make choices. The Center for Medicare Management will focus on the traditional fee-for-service program, dealing with providers. The Center for Medicaid and State Operation will focus on such programs as Medicaid, SCHIP and insurance regulation, administered by states.

For more information about these and other issues, visit the “Practice” area of the AACN Web site athttp:// www.aacn.org. Click on “Public Policy.”


On the Agenda

Following is a report by AACN Board member Kathleen McCauley, RN, PhD, CS, FAAN, on discussions and actions that took place at the board’s June 26, 2001, conference call.

Agenda Item: Scholarship Endowment
In an effort to preserve the association’s ability to fund educational scholarships for nurses, regardless of fluctuations in the economy, the board approved the establishment of a self-sustaining Scholarship Fund. Currently, the approximately $150,000 allocated for scholarships each year have come from the operating budget, though contributions from a variety of sources have partially offset this expenditure.

To create the fund, the board approved transferring approximately $46,000 in contributions received during FY01. Included in this amount are funds raised in AACN’s first Silent Auction and in a drawing for a Hyundai Santa FE SUV, both in conjunction with NTI 2001 in May, as well as individual and corporate gifts to the AACN Annual Fund.

The plan is build this reserve to a level at which the scholarships can be funded completely from investment revenue, though the board could still decide to add to the scholarship funding level as warranted.

The board, which is accountable for effectively managing association resources and planning for the future, was enthusiastic about this approach. Providing scholarships not only to attract new nurses, but also to support the academic and continuing education needs of existing nurses has been an important initiative for AACN since the early 1980s. However, the program has taken on heightened significance with the mounting pressures of the nursing shortage.

In addition to providing academic scholarships for nursing students who are not yet licensed and for undergraduate and graduate nursing students, the fund supports continuing education scholarships for nurses to attend the NTI.

Agenda Item: FY02 Board Officers
Validating the membership of the AACN Board of Directors and officers following the annual election is one of the formal governance actions required by the board each year. This action is necessary to acknowledge the change in composition of the board, in keeping with its responsibility to ensure effective governance.

For FY02, the board is comprised of returning directors Michael L Williams, RN, MSN, CCRN (president), Connie Barden, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN (president-elect), Jessica P. Palmer, RN, MSN (treasurer), Lori Hendrickx, RN, EdD, CCRN (secretary), Debbie Brinker, RN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, Bertie Chuong, RN, MS, CCRN, Dorrie Fontaine, RN, DNSc, FAAN, Kathleen McCauley, RN, PhD, CS, FAAN, and Rebecca E. Long, RN, MS, CNS, and newly elected directors M. David Hanson, RN, BSN, CCRN, Carol Ann Puz, RN, BSN, CCRN, Mary Fran Tracey, PhD, RN, CCRN, and Susan C. Yeager, RN, MS, CCRN.

Agenda Item: The InnoVision Group
In keeping with the desire to maintain focus on AACN’s core business, the board approved revisions to the bylaws of the InnoVision Group, the association’s for-profit subsidiary that publishes AACN journals and prints AACN resources and promotional materials. The InnoVision Group was formed to accommodate the potential for unrelated business income, while protecting the association’s nonprofit tax status.

Because of the more focused agenda following the sale of the Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine journal founded by AACN, the decision was made to reduce the number of directors on the InnoVision board from seven to three. To maintain the appropriate legal separation, the majority of the board will be individuals who are not current AACN board or staff members. Appointed to the board for FY02 were AACN CEO Wanda Johanson, RN, MN, as chair and executive vice president; Debra A. Byram, RN, MSN, as secretary; and Pamela T. Rudisill, RN, MSN, CCRN, ACNP, as director.

In addition, the bylaws were updated to incorporate new laws governing electronic communication.

Agenda Item: SCCM Meeting
Outgoing AACN President Denise Thornby, RN, MS, reported on a recent meeting with the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) in Chicago, Ill., to discuss the future direction of the collaborative partnership between AACN and SCCM. SCCM leadership representatives had invited Thornby, then President-elect Michael Williams, RN, MSN, CCRN, and Johanson to discuss ongoing issues and concerns between the associations and to begin to establish agreements and a framework for future collaborative work. A second joint leadership meeting is planned to further build working relationships and explore opportunities for the two organizations to work
together on behalf of critically ill patients and their families.

Agenda Item: NTI Evaluation
As part of the ongoing evaluation process that follows each NTI, board members discussed their experiences and the feedback they obtained at NTI 2001 in Anaheim, Calif. Helping to monitor and strengthen the association's programs is an important role for the board.

Prior to the NTI, board members had asked that their schedules provide for expanded opportunities for one-on-one discussions with NTI participants. Most indicated that they felt as if they had more time than in the past to talk with members and other stakeholders, though they would like to have even more time.

Overall, board members reported that they heard positive comments about the quality of the NTI from both first-time and returning participants.


Looking Ahead

August 2001

Aug. 10 Deadline to submit nominations for 2002 Circle of Excellence Awards. For more information or to obtain an awards booklet, call (800) 899-2226 and request Item #1011, or
visit the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org. Click on “Membership,” then “Awards.”

September 2001

Sept. 1 Deadline to submit research and creative solutions abstracts for AACN’s National Teaching Institute™ and Critical Care Exposition, scheduled for May 4 through 9, 2002, in
Atlanta, Ga. To obtain abstract forms, call (800) 899-2226. Request Item #6007 (research abstracts) or Item #6005 (creative solutions abstracts), or visit the “Clinical Practice”
area of the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org. Click on “Research.”

Sept. 1 Deadline to submit proposals for Agilent Technologies-AACN Critical Care Nursing Research Grant. To obtain an application, call (800) 899-2226 and request Item #1013, or
visit the “Clinical Practice” area of the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org. Click on “Research.”

October 2001

Oct. 1 Deadline to submit proposals for AACN Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Grant. To obtain an application, call (800) 899-2226 and request Item #1013, or visit the “Clinical Practice” area of the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org.

Oct. 1 Deadline to submit proposals for AACN Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Grant. To obtain an application, call (800) 899-2226 and request Item #1013, or visit the “Clinical Practice” area of the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org.

Oct. 1 Deadline to submit proposals for AACN Clinical Practice Grant.. To obtain an application, call (800) 899-2226 and request Item #1013, or visit the “Clinical Practice” area of the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org.

Oct. 1 Deadline to submit proposals for AACN-Sigma Theta Tau Critical Care Grant.. To obtain an application, call (800) 899-2226 and request Item #1013, or visit the “Clinical Practice” area of the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org.


Volunteers Contribute Time, Expertise

Each year, hundreds of AACN members contribute their time and expertise in a variety of capacities toward the important work of their professional association. From work groups that focus on specific outcomes to advisory teams that provide crucial feedback, these groups represent critical care nurses from different practice settings throughout the country.
The annual application process is completed in April of each year, with the national AACN Board of Directors finalizing all appointments. In addition, board members are appointed to serve as liaisons to many of these groups, further strengthening the connection between these committees and the national leadership team.
Following are the appointments to volunteer committees for 2001-02:

Advanced Practice Work Group
Alice Davis, RN, PhD, CNRN (Chair)
Sandra Cagle, RN, MSN, CCRN, ACNP
Patricia Gonce-Morton, RN, PhD, NP, ACNP, FAAN
Deborah Greenlaw, RNC, MS, CCRN. NP
Julie Marcum, RN, MS, CCRN, CS
Sarah Martin, RN, MS, CCRN
Sheila Melander, RN, DSN, ACNP, FCCM
Julie Stanik-Hutt, RN, PhD, CCRN, ACNP
Kathleen McCauley, RN, PhD, CS, FAAN
  (Board Liaison)

Education Work Group
Caryl Goodyear-Bruch, RN, MSN, CCRN (Chair)
Glenn Carlson, RN, BSN, CCRN
Mary Dent, RN, MA, CCRN
Cheryl Hettman, RN, PhD
Patricia Hoppman, RN, MS, CCRN
Mary Martin, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN, CS, CNRN
Lori Hendrickx, RN, EdD, CCRN (Board Liaison)

Ethics Work Group
Natalie Correll-Yoder, RN, MN, CCRN
  (Chairperson)
Dawn Blake-Holmes, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
Benny Bolin, RN, ADN, MS
Kate Sullivan Collopy, RN, PhD, CCNS, CCRN
Julie McNulty, RN, BSN, CCRN
Pamela Popplewell, RN, BSN, CCRN
Nancy Seymour, RN, BSN, CCRN
Christine Westphal, RN, MSN, CCRN
Carol Puz, RN, BSN, CCRN (Board Liaison)


Leadership Development
Work Group
Lisa Pettrey, RN, MS (Cochair)
Bonnie Sakallaris, RN, MSN, CCRN (Cochair)
Stephanie Calcasola, RN, MSN
Suzette Cardin, RN, DNSc, CNAA, FAAN
Anne LaVoice Hawkins, RN, MS
Mary McKinley, RN, MSN, CCRN
Connie Barden, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
  (Board Liaison)
Dorrie Fontaine, RN, DNSc, FAAN (Board Liaison)
Susan Yeager, RN, MS, CCRN (Board Liaison)

NTI Work Group
John Dixon Jr., RN, MSN (Chair)
Lillian Ananian, RN, MSN
Linda Bucher, RN, DNSc
Carolyn Byrum, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
Janet Denmark, RN, MSN
Celeste Smith, RN, BSN, CCRN
Teresa Solberg, RN, MSN, CCRN
Debbie Brinker, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
  (Board Liaison)

Public Policy Work Group
Victoria Boyce, RN, MSN (Chair)
Margaret Carno, RN, MS, MBA, CCRN
Elsie Croom, RN, BSN, CCRN
Theresa DeVeaux, RN, BSN, CCRN
Deri Dority, RN, BSN, BS, CCRN
Kevin Hook, RN
Diane Mayes, RN, MSN, CCRN
Katherine McEwen, RN, BSN, RT(R)
Alisa Shackelford, RN, CCRN
Brenda Truman, RN
Larraine Yeager, RN, BSN
Rebecca Long, RN, MS, CNS (Board Liaison)

Research Work Group
Paula Lusardi, RN, PhD, CCNS, CCRN (Chair)
Susan Barnason, RN, PhD, CCRN, CS
Karen Gaertner, RN, MSN, CCRN
Betsy George, RN, PhD, CCRN
Sandra Smith, PhD, APRN
Elaine Steinke, RN, MN, PhD
Susan Woods, RN, PhD
Mary Fran Tracy, RN, PhD, CCRN (Board Liaison)

Chapter and Membership Awards Review Panel
Ronna Carlton, RN, BSN, CCRN
Carol Cleek, RN, MSN, CS
Damon Cottrell, RN, MS, CCRN, CEN


Rita Free, RN, MS
Coleen Fritsche, RN, MS, CCRN, ACNP
Cecilia Garrison, RN, MS, CCRN
Jane Hartman, RN, MS, CCRN
Mary Jo Hartung, RN, BSN, BA, CCRN
Patricia Kelly, RN, BSN, CCRN
Mary McKinley, RN, MSN, CCRN
Tracie McVey, RN, CCRN
Mary Olson, RN, BSN, CCRN
Amy Schueler, RN, MS, CCRN, CNP
Connie Sensor, RN, MSN, CCRN
Deborah Shields, RN, MS, CCRN
Linda Tamburri, RN, MS, CCRN
Joyce Taylor, RN, BSN, MA, CCRN
Steve Widmar, RN, ADN

Continuing Education
Articles Review Panel
Ferne Alderfer, RN, BSN
Eugene Anderson, RN, MSN, BA, CCRN
Linda Batts, RN, CCRN
Candace Becker, RN, BSN
Karen Bird, RN, ADN, BS, CCRN
Dawn Blake-Holmes, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
Jeanne Braby, RN, MSN, CCRN
Marylee Bressie, RN, MSN, CCRN
Eileen Briening, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
Carolyn Byrum, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
Stephen Campbell, RN, MSN, AA, CCRN, CEN
Donna Charlebois, RN, MSN, CCRN, ACNP
Damon Cottrell, RN, MS, CCRN, CEN
Jo Ellen Craghead, RN, MSN, CCRN
Janet Davies, RN, MSN
Louise Diehl-Oplinger, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS
Michael Frakes, RN, BSN, BA, CCRN
Mary Franklin, RN, MS, CCRN, CS, ACNP
Rita Free, RN, MS
Henry Geiter Jr., RN, CCRN
Jane Grimberg, RN, MS, CCRN
Todd Grivetti, RN, ADN, CCRN
Sheila Grossman, RN, PhD, APRN
Rebecca Hardy, RN, BSN, AA, CCRN
Lee Ann Haygood, RN, BSN, CCRN, CNA
Kim Heuvel, RN, MS, CCRN, ACNP
Patricia Hoppman, RN, MS, CCRN
Lian Huang, RN, MSN, CCRN
Melissa Hutchinson, RN, CCRN
Linda Ireland, RN, MS
Lori Jackson, RNC, CCRN, NP
Lisa Kohr RN, MSN, CCRN, PNP
Barbara Krumbach, RN, MSN, CCRN
Joan LaBarr, RN, BSN, CCRN
Kelly Machuca, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS, ACNP
Jeanne Maiden, RN, MS, CCRN
Margaret Malone, RN, MS, CCRN
Karen March, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS
Sarah Martin, RN, MS, CCRN
Claire McGowan, RN, MS, CCRN, CS, CP
Cheryl McKay, RN, MSN
Katerina Moklak, RN, BSN, BS, CCRN
Barbara Monroe, RN, MS, CCRN
Linda Morris, RN, PhD
Dee Oliveri, RN
Mary Olson, RN, BSN, CCRN
Theresa Posani, RN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, CS, CNA
Diana Reid, RN, BSN, CCRN
Kathryn Roberts, RN, MSN, CCRN
Joyce Roth, RN, MSN, CCRN, CNA
Sharon Sauer, RN, MSN, CCRN
Steve Senecal, RN, ADN, MS, CCRN
Kathryn Sheehan, RN, MSN, CCRN, AANP, CPNP
Deborah Shields, RN, MS, CCRN
Sandy Swoboda, RN, MS
Joyce Taylor, RN, BSN, MA, CCRN
Stephanie Van Arsdale, RN, MSN, EdD, CCRN
Mary Walker, RN, MSN, CCRN
Cindy Wetzel, RN, MSN, CCRN
Steve Widmar, RN, ADN
Patricia Worster, RN, MS
Larraine Yeager, RN, BSN

NTI Review Panel
Eugene Anderson, RN, MSN, BA, CCRN
Judy Bezanson, RN, DSN
Dennis Cheek, RN, MSN, PhD
Damon Cottrell, RN, MS, CCRN, CEN
Colleen Counsell, RN, MSN, CCRN
Jo Ellen Craghead, RN, MSN, CCRN
Claire Curran, RN, BSN, CCRN, EMT
Brenda Hardin-Wike, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
Andrea Kline, RN, MS, CCRN, NP
Joan LaBarr, RN, BSN, CCRN
Kay Luft, RN, MN, CCRN, TNCC
Tracie McVey, RN, CCRN
Martha Musielak, RN, MSN, NP
Patricia O’Malley, RN, PhD, CCRN
Mary Frances Pate, RN, DSN
Jodi Rogers, RN, MS, CCRN
Sandra Smith, PhD, APRN
Julie Stanik-Hutt, RN, PhD, CCRN, ACNP
Susan Walsh, RN, MSN
Charlene Winters, RN, DNSc, CS
Shu Fen Wung, RN, PhD, CIC

Research & Creative Solutions Abstracts Review Panel
Judy Bezanson, RN, DSN
Paula Carson, RN, PhD, CCRN
Colleen Counsell, RN, MSN, CCRN
Sherill Cronin, RN, PhD
Shelly Fields-Ryan, RN, MS, CCRN
Roberta Fruth, RN, MS, PhD, CCRN
Imelda Gerard, RN, CCRN
Tracy Grogan, Med, CCRN
Denise Guaglianone-Buonocore, RN, MSN, CCRN,
   CS, APRN, ACNP
Melissa Hutchinson, RN, CCRN
Linda Ireland, RN, MS
Lori Jackson, RN-C, CCRN, NP
Christine Kruskamp, RN, MS, CCRN
Mary Martin, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN, CS, CNRN
Cathy Mawdsley, RN, MSN
Patricia O’Malley, RN, PhD, CCRN
Pamela Popplewell, RN, BSN, CCRN
Sandra Smith, PhD, APRN
Susan Woods, RN, PhD
Diane Wrobleski, RN, MS, CEN
Shu Fen Wung, RN, PhD, CIC

Research Grants Review Panel
Judy Bezanson, RN, DSN
Sherill Cronin, RN, PhD
Susan Fowler, RN, MS, CCRN, CNRN, CS
Margaret Hodge
Brenda Jeffers, RN, PhD
Roberta Kaplow, RN, PhD, CCNS, CCRN
Patricia O’Malley, RN, PhD, CCRN
Lynn Simko, RN, PhD, CCRN
Mickey Stanley, RN, PhD, CS, CNA
Judy Trivits Verger, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS, NP
Charlene Winters, RN, DNSc, CS
Mary Danette Wood, RN, MSN, EdD, CCRN
Susan Woods, RN, PhD
Diane Wrobleski, RN, MS, CEN
Shu Fen Wung, RN, PhD, CIC

Scholarship Review Panel
Elizabeth Carson, RN, MS
Terry Cicero, RN, MN, BS, CCRN
Carol Cleek, RN, MSN, CS
Hatice Foell, RN, MSN
Coleen Fritsche, RN, MS, CCRN, ACNP
Jane Grimberg, RN, MS, CCRN
Mary Jo Hartung, RN, BSN, BA, CCRN
Joyce Roth, RN, MSN, CCRN, CNA
Karen Setti, RN, MSN, CCRN, ACNP
M. Cecilia Wendler, RN, PhD, CCRN
Mary Danette Wood, RN, MSN, EdD, CCRN
Diane Wrobleski, RN, MS, CEN

Nurse Manager Think Tank
Rosanne Raso, RN, MS, CNAA (Chair)
Nancy Blake, RN, MN, CCRN, CNAA
Tonya Harter, RN
Sharon Hershman, RN
Deborah Laughon, RN, BSN, MS, CCRN
Susan Nelmark, RN, BA, CCRN
Lori Popkes, RN, BAN, CCRN
Nora Protokowicz, RN, MSN
Susan Schindler, RN, BSN, CCRN
Janis Watts, RN, BSN, CCRN
Bertie Chuong, RN, MS, CCRN (Board Liaison)
Jessica Palmer, RN, MSN (Board Liaison)

Progressive Care/Intermediate Care/Stepdown Unit Task Force
LeAnn Ash, RN, BSN, CCRN (Cochair)
Melissa Fitzpatrick, RN, MSN, FAAN (Cochair)
Madeleine Burke, RN, CCRN
Randeen Cordier, RN, MSN
Susan Helms, RN, MSN, CCRN
Mary Palazzo, RN, MS, CCRN
Juan Quintero, RN, MSN, CCRN
Diane Salipante, RN, MSN, MS, CCRN
M. Dave Hanson, RN, BSN, CCRN (Board Liaison)

Chapter Advisory Team
Nancy Ames, RN, MSN, CCRN
Darlene Bradley, RN, MSN, MA, CCRN, CEN
Ruth Bryan, RN, MSN, CCRN
Maggie Carriker, RN, MSN
Wendy Clark, RN, MSN, CCRN
Captain Marla De Jong, RN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, CEN
Kathy Graham, RN, BSN, CCRN
Brenda Hardin-Wike, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
LouAnn Honek, RN
Roberta Kaplow, RN, PhD, CCNS, CCRN
Judith Lang, RN, BS, BA, CCRN
Barbara Monroe, RN, MS, CCRN
Jill Overman, RN, ADN
Jackie Palmer, RN, ADN, AA, CEN
Kristine Peterson, RN, MS, CCRN
Clare Tack, RN, MSN, CCRN
Laurie Willmitch, RN, BSN, CCRN
Polly Zahrt, RN, BSN
Jenny Zaker, RN, MEd
Bertie Chuong, RN, MS, CCRN (Board Liaison)
Kathleen McCauley, RN, PhD, CS, FAAN
  (Board Liaison)

AACN Board Advisory Team
Marian Altman, RN, MS, CCRN, NP
Cindy Baggott, RN, MS, CCRN
Christine Baxter, RN, CCRN
Denise Guaglianone-Buonocore, RN, MSN, CCRN,
   CS, APRN, ACNP
Carol Braund, RN, MA, CCRN
Rita Free, RN, MS
Cecilia Garrison, RN, MS, CCRN
Tonya Harter, RN
Mary Ann House-Fancher, MSN, ARNP
Melissa Hutchinson, RN, CCRN
Louisa Kamatuka, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS
Lori Kennedy, RN, BSN, CCRN
Kelly Machuca, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS, ACNP
Kate Moore, RN, MSN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, NP
Winfred Moore, RN, ADN, CCRN
Linda Morris, RN, PhD
Janet Mulroy, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
Mary Frances Pate, RN, DSN
Theresa Posani, RN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, CS, CNA
Sarah Samick, RN, BS, CCRN
Sharon Sauer, RN, MSN, CCRN
Amy Schueler, RN, MS, CCRN, CNP
Deborah Shields, RN, MS, CCRN
Bridget Shoulders-Odum, RN, MS, CCRN
Mary Stewart, RN, BSN, MBA
Joyce Taylor, RN, BSN, MA, CCRN
Janice Wojcik, RN, MS, CCRN, CS
Mary Wyckoff, RN, MSN, ARNP, NNP

Advanced Practice Advisory Team
Thomas Barkley Jr., RN, DSN, ACNP, CS
Carol Bishop, RN, MSN, BA, CCRN
Steve Branham, RN, MSN, CCRN, ACNP
Carol Braund, RN, MA, CCRN
Donna Charlebois, RN, MSN, CCRN, ACNP
Louise Diehl-Oplinger, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS
Phyllis Gordon, RN, MSN, CS
Angela Green, RN, MSN, CRNP
Debra Hall, RN-C, MSN, CCRN
Mary Ann House-Fancher, MSN, ARNP
Kim Heuvel, RN, MS, CCRN, ACNP
Gregory Knutzen, RN, MSN, BA, CCRN
Kelly Machuca, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS, ACNP
Cathy Mawdsley, RN, MSN
Claire McGowan, RN, MS, CCRN, CS, CP
Sally Miller, RN, PhD, CS, NP.C
Kate Moore, RN, MSN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, NP
Angela Nelson, RN, MSN, CCRN, ACNP
Kathy Noyes, MSN, ACNP, FNP
Theresa Posani, RN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, CS, CNA
Jan Powers, RN, MSN, CCRN
Kathryn Roberts, RN, MSN, CCRN
Karen Setti, RN, MSN, CCRN, ACNP
Shari Simone, RN, MS, CCRN, CRNP
Brenda Snyder, RN, MS, CCRN
Leslie Sossoman, RN, MSN, ACNP, CPHQ
Mary Tierney, RN, MSN, CCRN, ANP
Rita Whitcomb, RN, MSN, CCRN, ARNP
Bruce Williams, RN, MSN, CCRN, CEN, CS
Arlyn Wasco-Durham, RN, MSN, CCRN, NP
Janice Wojcik, RN, MS, CCRN, CS
Mary Wyckoff, RN, MSN, ARNP, NNP

Ethics Advisory Team
Barbara Brockway, RN, CCRN-R
Katherine Davis, RN
Patricia Kelly, RN, BSN, CCRN
D.J. Martin, RN, BSN, CEN
Christine Nordin, RN, BSN, CCRN
Susan Oakes, RN, MS, JD, CCRN
Dee Oliveri, RN
Elaine Rose, RN, BN
Christa Schorr, RN, ADN, CCRN
Dawn Seery, RN, BS, CCRN

Faculty Advisory Team
Katherine Abriam-Yago, RN, EdD
Kathleen Ashton, RN, PhD, CS
Margaret Bagnardi, RN, MSN, CCRN, NP
Elizabeth Bayley, RN, PhD
Marilyn Belli, RN, MSN
Jane Bircheat, RN, MSN, CCRN
Lynn Browning, RN, MSN
Linda Bucher, RN, DNSc
Elizabeth Carson, RN, MS
Stephanie Christian, RN, MS, CCRN
Christine Crumlish-O’Shaugnessy, RN, PhD, CCRN, CS
Luann Daggett, RN, DSN
Rebecca Dahlen, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS
Barbara Daly, RN, MSN, PhD, FAAN
Juli Daniels, RN, MSN, CCRN
Diane Dressler, RN, MSN, CCRN
Kathleen Farrell, RN, MS, CCRN
Jill Hecker Fernandes, RNC, MSN, NP
Dorrie Fontaine, RN, DNSc, FAAN
Beverly Gay, RN, MSN, BA
Kathleen Geib, RN, MSN
Barbara Goldberg-Chamberlain, RN, MSN, BA,
   CCRN, CS
Patricia Gonce-Morton, RN, PhD, NP, ACNP, FAAN
Sheila Grossman, RN, PhD, APRN
Donna Guilette, RN, DSN
Yevette Harrell, RN, BSN
Jo Ann Jenkins, RN, MSN, CCRN
Peggy Jenkins, RN, MS, CCRN
Karen Johnson-Brennan, RN, PhD
Catherine Kelly, RN, PhD, CCRN, CEN, NP
Joan King, RN, MSN, PhD
Marguerite Knox, RN, MN, CCRN, NP
Carolyn Kreamer, RN, PhD
Kay Luft, RN, MN, CCRN, TNCC
Gail Marchigiano, RN, MSN
Mary Martin, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN, CS, CNRN
Jill Mayo, RN, MSN
Catherine McCoy-Hill, RN, MSN, CCRN
Rhonda McLain, RN, MN
Kathleen Miller, RN, EdD, ACNP, CS
Sheila Myer, RN, MSN
Charlene Myers, RN, MSN, MS, CCRN, NP
Mae Ann Pasquale, RN, MSN, CCRN
Barbara Phelan, RN, DNSc, CCRN, CS
Deborah Pool, RN, MS, CCRN
Deanna Reising, RN, PhD, CS
Carla Smith, RN, MS, CNOR
Nan Smith-Blair, RN, MSN
Mary Lou Sole, RN, PhD, CCRN, FAAN
Wanda Staab, RN, MSN, CCRN
Maria Tackett, RN, MSN, CCRN, CEN
Mona Ternus, RN, MSN, BA, CCRN
Cathy Thompson, RN, PhD, CCRN
Renee Twibell, RN, DSN
Mechelle Williams, RN, MSN, AA, NP, ACNP
Charlene Winters, RN, DNSc, CS
Susan Woods, RN, PhD
Eden Zabat, RN, MSN

Membership Advisory Team
Carol Bishop, RN, MSN, BA, CCRN
Steve Branham, RN, MSN, CCRN, ACNP
Marylee Bressie, RN, MSN, CCRN
Colleen Counsell, RN, MSN, CCRN
Hatice Foell, RN, MSN
Lori Kennedy, RN, BSN, CCRN
Linda Morris, RN, PhD
Leslie Anne Swadener-Culpepper, RN, MSN, CCRN

Neonatal Advisory Team
Angela Green, RN, MSN, CRNP
Kathryn Krayk, RN, ADN, AA
Jacqueline McGrath, RN, PhD, CCNS, NNP
M. Terese Verklan, RNC, PhD, CCNS
Mary Wyckoff, RN, MSN, ARNP, NNP

Novice Critical Care
Nurses Advisory Team
Melinda Bender, RN, MSN, CCRN
Marcia Bixby, RN, MS, CCRN, CS
Piper Bodkin, RN
Patricia Bradshaw, RN, BSN, CCRN
Frances Brown, RN, BSN, CCRN
Diana Eisnaugle, RN, CCRN
Anne Ferguson, RN
Henry Geiter Jr., RN, CCRN
Tracy Grogan, RN, MEd, CCRN
Debra Hall, RNC, MSN, CCRN
Lisa Hansen, RN, MSN, CCRN
Ina Koerner, RN, MSN
Cheryl McGaffic, RN, PhD, CCRN
Lisa Milonovich, RN, BSN, CCRN
Joann Morris, RN, BS
Susan Oakes, RN, MS, JD, CCRN
John Pozar, RN, BS, BA, CCRN
Deborah Raley, RN, MSN
Clare Tack, RN, MSN, CCRN
Kathleen Vitthuhn, RNC, BSN, MS
Brandy Wallace, RN, BSN
Mary Watkins, RN
Joan Wilson, RN, BSN, CCRN
Beth Zimmerman, RN, BSN

Nurse Manager Advisory Team
Steven Brown, RN, BSN
Carol Cleek, RN, MSN, CS
Diana Contino, RN, BSN, MBA, CCRN, CEN
Jo Ellen Craghead, RN, MSN, CCRN
Christine Cutugno, RN, PhD, CCRN
Carmen Ferrell, RN, BSN, AA, CCRN
Barbara Garabedian, RN, BSN
Karin Henderson, RN, MSN, CCRN
Margaret LaBeur, RN, BSN
Linda Lapointe, RN, BS
Ann Moylan, RN, MA
Martha Musielak, RN, MSN, NP
Cheryl Paul, RN, CCRN
Nora Protokowicz, RN, MSN
Robert Rose, RN, BSN, CCRN
Steve Senecal, RN, ADN, MS, CCRN
Pamela Shellner, RN, BSN
Holly Weber-Johnson, RN, BSN
Online Advisory Team
Elizabeth Benson, RN, BSN, MBA, CCRN
Carol Bishop, RN, MSN, BA, CCRN
Paula Carson, RN, PhD, CCRN
Marcia Chorba, RN, MSN
Deri Dority, RN, BSN, BS, CCRN
Nancy Grant, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
Brenda Hardin-Wike, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
Lee Ann Haygood, RN, BSN, CCRN, CNA
Mary Holtschneider, RN, BSN
Thomas Lowndes, RN, ADN, BS, CCRN
Sara McMannus, RN, BSN, BS, CCRN
Katherine Samon, RN, MSN, CCRN
Leslie Swadener-Culpepper, RN, MSN, CCRN

Pediatric Advisory Team
Kathryn Beauchamp, RN, MSN, CCRN, PNP, CPNP
Eileen Briening, RN, MSN, CCRN, NP
Margaret Carno, RN, MS, MBA, CCRN
Cheryl Corish, RN, MSN
Janet Davies, RN, MSN
Carmen Ferrell, RN, BSN, AA, CCRN
Jill Hecker Fernandes, RNC, MSN, NP
Barbara Garabedian, RN, BSN
Lisa Hansen, RN, MSN, CCRN
Fran Iacobellis, RN, MSN, MS, CCRN
Andrea Kline, RN, MS, CCRN, NP
Jeanne Maiden, RN, MS, CCRN
Lisa Milonovich, RN, BSN, CCRN
Janet Mulroy, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN
Jennifer Nitschmann, RN, MSN, CNA
Mary Frances Pate, RN, DSN
Timothy Rausch, RN, BS, CCRN
Jodi Rogers, RN, MS, CCRN
Kathryn Sheehan, RN, MSN, CCRN, AANP, CPNP
Pamela Shellner, RN, BSN
Julie Warren, RN, MSN, BA, CCRN
Steve Widmar, RN, ADN

Practice Advisory Team
Cindy Baggott, RN, MS, CCRN
Linda Batts, RN, CCRN
Jayne Brundage, RN, BSN
Donna Charlebois, RN, MSN, CCRN, ACNP
Sandy DeSalvo, RN, MSN, BS, CCRN, CS
Michael Frakes, RN, BSN, BA, CCRN
Cecilia Garrison, RN, MS, CCRN
Diana Reid, RN, BSN, CCRN
Sarah Samick, RN, BS, CCRN
Nancy Seymour, RN, BSN, CCRN
Beth Zimmerman, RN, BSN

Progressive Care
Advisory Team
Becki Daniels, RN, MS, CNAA
Susan Helms, RN, MSN, CCRN
Lian Huang, RN, MSN, CCRN
Sara McMannus, RN, BSN, BS, CCRN
Patricia Rosier, RN, MSN, CS
Christa Schorr, RN, ADN, CCRN
Clare Tack, RN, MSN, CCRN
Barbara Washington-Knight, RN, BS, CCRN

Student Nurses Advisory Team
Christine Baxter, RN, CCRN
Elizabeth Carson, RN, MS
Terry Cicero, RN, MN, BS, CCRN
Rebecca Dahlen, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS
Michael Day, RN, MSN, CCRN
Diana Eisnaugle, RN, CCRN
Brenda Jeffers, RN, PhD
Jo Ann Jenkins, RN, MSN, CCRN
Ina Koerner, RN, MSN
Kay Luft, RN, MN, CCRN, TNCC
Cynthia McCoy, RN, MSN, CCRN
Joann Morris, RN, BS
Pamala Pethtel, RN, MSN, CCRN
John Pozar, RN, BS, BA, CCRN
Maria Roach, RN, BSN, CCRN
Audrey Roberson, RN, MS
Elliot Stetson, RNC, MSN, CCRN
Mary Watkins, RN