AACN News—June 2001—Association News

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Vol. 18, No. 6, JUNE 2001


Links Are Critical; Become an AACN Member Recruiter

Share the benefits of membership in AACN with your colleagues! Your commitment to recruiting new members and building the association’s voice and influence will earn you rewards. In fact, when you recruit just one new member, you will receive an AACN pocket reference. And, the rewards can build from there.

Critical Links, the new AACN Member-Get-A-Member campaign, was launched in May 2001 at AACN’s National Teaching Institute™ and Critical Care Exposition in Anaheim, Calif. The campaign concludes April 1, 2002, with top recruiters, both individuals and chapters, to be recognized at NTI 2002 in Atlanta, Ga.

All member recruiters need to do is make certain that their name and AACN member number are included on the new members’ application forms.

Individual Rewards
The reward for the top individual recruiter overall is $500 or an American Express gift certificate. The top recruiter is also eligible for the first-, second- and third-place prize drawings:

1st Prize—Round-trip tickets for two to anywhere in the continental U.S., including a five-day, four-night hotel stay.
2nd Prize—Round-trip tickets for two to anywhere in the continental U.S.
3rd Prize—Four-days, three-nights hotel accommodations at a Marriott Hotel.

However, you don’t have to be one of the top recruiters to earn valuable rewards. In addition to the pocket reference you receive for recruiting your first new member, you will receive a $25 gift certificate toward the purchase of AACN resources when you recruit five new members and a $50 AACN gift certificate when you recruit 10 new members.

Each month, members who have recruited at least one new member in the month will also be entered into a monthly drawing for a $100 American Express gift certificate.

Chapter Rewards
In addition to a $250 gift certificate toward the purchase of AACN resources, chapters reporting the largest increase in membership numbers or the largest percentage increase will receive special recognition at NTI 2002 in Atlanta, Ga. Each month, chapters that recruit new members will also be entered into a drawing for a complimentary registration for NTI 2002.

To obtain Critical Links Member-Get-A-Member recruitment campaign forms, call (800) 899-2226. Request Item #1316, or visit the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org and click on “Membership” for campaign information.

Put Yourself or a Colleague in the Circle of Excellence

Have you had an experience that made a difference in the life of a patient and family? Has one of your colleagues been an inspiration to you and others?
The AACN Circle of Excellence recognition program honors individuals who have made a difference in healthcare, and the lives of patients and their families. Sponsored by AACN and its Partners With Industry companies, the awards applaud excellence, honor leadership and show appreciation for the dedication of nurses whose contributions and achievements exemplify AACN’s mission and vision.

The deadline to nominate yourself or a colleague for one of these awards for 2002 is July 15, 2001.

Circle of Excellence award recipients are recognized in a variety of ways. Many will receive complimentary airfare, hotel accommodations and registration to AACN’s National Teaching Institute™ and Critical Care Exposition, scheduled for May 4 through 9, 2002, in Atlanta, Ga.

Several new awards are available for 2002. In addition, revisions have been to some existing awards.
The new awards are:

AACN Excellence in Clinical Practice-Non-Traditional Setting
This award recognizes excellence in the care of critically ill patients in environments outside of the traditional ICU/CCU setting. Successful applicants will demonstrate that their patients were acutely or critically ill and address how they have successfully integrated the following into their practice: standards of care; patient advocacy; holistic care; collaboration and coordination of care; leadership; inquiry and critical thinking; ethics; and values. Eligible applicants include, but are not limited to, nurses working in home healthcare, progressive care, telemetry, step-down, catheter lab and emergency departments. Recipients will receive complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

AACN Excellent Student Nurse Award
This award recognizes nursing students whose activities during nursing school have promoted the value of nursing and reflect the AACN vision of creating a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and families, where critical care nurses can make their optimal contribution. Successful applicants will show how their leadership has transformed thinking, structures or process to address opportunities and challenges, as well as how they collaborated with key stakeholders to create synergistic relationships to promote common interests and shared values. Individual students or groups of students are eligible to apply. Recipients will receive a complimentary three-year AACN membership.

AACN Excellence in Research Award
This award recognizes nurse researchers who, through their career and body of research, are furthering the mission, vision and research priorities of AACN. Successful applicants will describe the full scope of the research studies they have conducted and how the results have impacted the practice of critical care nursing, specifically the impact on patients and families. Applicants will also provide a list of their presentations and publications.

Oridion-AACN Excellent Clinical Nurse Specialist Award
(formerly part of the Oridion-AACN Excellent Advanced Practice Nurse Award)


This award recognizes acute and critical care nurses who function as clinical nurse specialists. Applicants must be CCNS certified. Successful applicants will demonstrate the key components of advanced practice nursing, including: leadership, advanced practice clinical skills, research application, evidence-based practice, outcome-focused practice, cost containment, quality assurance, mentoring, problem solving and communication with patients, families, staff and systems. In addition, they will illustrate how they have been a catalyst for successful change. Recipients will receive complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI, which features the Advanced Practice Institute (API).

AACN Excellent Nurse Practitioner Award
(formerly part of the Oridion-AACN Excellent Advanced Practice Nurse Award)
This award recognizes acute and critical care nurses who function as nurse practitioners. Applicants must be ACNP certified. Successful applicants will demonstrate the key components of advanced practice nursing. including leadership, advanced practice clinical skills, research application, evidence-based practice, outcome-focused practice, cost containment, quality assurance, mentoring, problem solving and communication with patients, families, staff and systems. In addition, they will illustrate how they have served as a catalyst for successful change. Recipients will receive complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI, which features the API.

The Oridion-Excellent Clinical Nurse Specialist Award and the Excellent Nurse Practitioner Award, which replace the Oridion-AACN Excellent Advanced Practice Nurse Award, are designed to better recognize the unique roles these advanced practice nurses fill.

In addition, the Excellence in Management Award was changed to Excellent Nurse Manager Award to clarify who the award is intended to recognize.

Following are the other awards for which nominations are now being accepted:

Ross Products-AACN Pioneering Spirit Award

This award recognizes significant contributions that influence acute and critical care nursing. The contributions must be far-reaching and exemplify a pioneering spirit. Recipients are
presented a plaque and $500 honorarium, as well as complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

AACN-Marguerite Rodgers Kinney Award for a Distinguished Career
This award recognizes individuals who are completing or have completed an extraordinary and distinguished professional career, which has had a significant impact on fulfilling the mission and vision of AACN and enhanced the care of acute and critically ill patients and their families. In recognition of the selfless contributions recipients of this award have made throughout their careers, a gift of $1,000 is made to a charitable cause of their choice. Recipients are also given lifetime membership in the association and a replica of the crystal AACN presidential Vision icon.

AACN Honorary Member Award
This award honors those who have achieved national recognition for contributions in clinical practice, administration, education, research or legislation, and who have fostered and promoted a positive image for nursing. In addition to honorary AACN membership, recipients are presented a personalized plaque as well as complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

AACN Lifetime Member Award
This award recognizes AACN members who have rendered distinguished service to the association and demonstrated potential for continuing contributions to acute and critical care nursing through AACN. In addition to lifetime AACN membership, recipients are presented a personalized plaque, as well as complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

AACN Mentoring Award
This award recognizes individuals or groups who develop and enhance another’s intellectual and technical skills, acculturating them to the professional community, and modeling a way of life and professional achievement. Recipients are presented a personalized plaque.

AACN Excellence in Caring Practices Award
Presented in honor of John Wilson Rodgers, this award recognizes nurses whose caring practices embody AACN’s vision of creating a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and families. Successful applicants empower patients and families by helping patients and families understand and cope with illness; offering avenues or possibilities of understanding; increasing control and acceptance of a difficult experience; and demonstrating vigilance, persistence and commitment to the patient and family’s life or well-being. They also make the patient’s problem approachable and manageable through his or her own ability to face and cope with the problem. These applicants will demonstrate how they have encompassed the AACN Values and Ethic of Care in their work. Recipients receive complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

Eli Lilly-AACN Excellent Preceptor Award


This award recognizes preceptors who demonstrate the key components of the preceptor role including teacher, clinical role model, consultant and friend/advocate. Recipients are provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

3M Health Care-AACN Excellence in Clinical Practice Award


This award recognizes acute and critical care nurses who embody, exemplify and excel at the clinical skills and principles that are required in their practice. Successful applicants will address how they have successfully integrated the following into their practice: standards of care; patient advocacy; holistic care; collaboration and coordination of care; leadership; inquiry and critical thinking; values; and ethics. The recipients are provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

Bard-AACN Excellence in Education Award


This award recognizes nurse educators who facilitate the acquisition and advancement of the knowledge and skills required for competent practice and positive patient outcomes in the care of acute and critically ill patients and their families. Recipients are provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

AACN Innovision Award
This award recognizes initiatives and programs that innovatively and collaboratively meet the needs of families of the acute and critically ill. Up to three awards, with $2,500 earmarked to fund projects, are granted to partnerships that include an AACN member, a healthcare provider organization and a community group. In addition, individual recipients are given public recognition and a personalized plaque.

AACN Excellence in Leadership Award
This award recognizes nurses who demonstrate the key leadership competencies of empowerment, effective communication and continuous learning, and the effective management of change. Recipients are provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

AACN Multidisciplinary Team Award
This award recognizes a multidisciplinary team that clearly practices key principles of collaboration and multidisciplinary practice. Up to three awards are given, with $2,500 earmarked to fund projects. In addition, individual recipients are given public recognition and a personalized plaque.

Seabury& Smith-AACN Community Service Award


This award recognizes significant service by acute and critical care nurses, as individuals or in groups, who make a contribution to their community. Individuals or groups selected receive complimentary registration to the NTI, or they may choose up to $500 toward speaker fees for an educational symposium.

AACN Excellent Nurse Manager Award
This award recognizes nurse managers who demonstrate excellence in coordination of available resources to efficiently and effectively care for acute or critically
ill patients and families. Successful applicants will address how they promote an environment of professional involvement, development and accountability; collaborative problem solving; empowerment; leadership to transform thinking; structures and processes to address opportunities and challenges; and communication, as well as how they serve as a catalyst for successful change. Recipients are provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

AACN Distinguished Research Lecturer Award
This award honors a nationally known researcher, who presents the annual Distinguished Research Lecture at the NTI. The lecturer receives an honorarium of $1,000, as well as $1,000 toward NTI expenses.

Media Award
This award recognizes print, broadcast and Web-based media excellence in the portrayal of healthcare providers, especially acute and critical care nurses contributing to a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and families. Successful entries will present relevant nursing and healthcare topics to large audiences of consumers, including the general public, patients and families. Accuracy, realism and technical qualities are important factors in the selection of entries. AACN members and chapters, as well as editors, publishers, producers, marketing and public relations specialists, universities and institutional communications departments are eligible to apply. Entries must have been published or broadcast between July 1 of the previous year and the time of submission. Entries must include documentation verifying the publication/broadcast and size of audience. A personalized plaque is presented to winning entries. Awards are announced in AACN publications and at the NTI.

To obtain the Circle of Excellence awards guide, call (800) 899-2226 and request Item #1011, or visit the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org. Click on “Membership,” then “Awards, Grants, Scholarships.”


For the Record

Some information was incorrect or incomplete in an article in the May 2001 issue of AACN News announcing the recipients of Circle of Excellence Awards for 2001. Following is the correct information.

Outstanding Chapter Educational Program Award

Suspension Bridge Chapter
and Three Rivers Chapter

Multidisiplinary Team Award
Heart Failure Intervention Team
University of Texas
Medical Branch
Galveston, Tex.

In the Circle: The AACN Innovision Award

The AACN Innovision Award is part of AACN’s Circle of Excellence recognition program. This award recognizes initiatives and programs that innovatively and collaboratively meet the needs of families of the acute and critically ill. Awards of up to $2,500 earmarked to fund projects are granted to partnerships that include an AACN member, a healthcare provider organization and a community group. In addition, individual recipients are given public recognition and a personalized plaque.

The deadline to apply for Circle of Excellence Awards for 2002 is July 15, 2001. To obtain an awards guide, call (800) 899-AACN (2226) and request Item #1011, or visit the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org.

Following are excerpts from exemplars submitted by recipients of this award for 2000.

Traumatic Brain Injury Team
Clarian Health Methodist Hospital
Indianapolis, Ind.

Our Level One Trauma Neuro Critical Care Unit is a 25-bed unit that receives neurovascular, neurology and traumatic brain injury patients from all over the state. The unit currently has a support group to meet the emotional and educational needs of families from the neurovascular and neurology sector. Except for the TBI sector, there was no organized support system to meet their needs.

Realizing that education and emotional support given at the bedside was not satisfactorily meeting the needs of family members of TBI patients, a group of six nurses from our unit voluntarily met to discuss the development of a Traumatic Brain Injury Group.

Goals and objectives were discussed. Printed materials for each diagnosis were developed and promotional flyers were designed and placed around the unit. Our peers were made aware of the newly formed group. Families of TBI patients were personally invited to attend. We chose to meet in a nonthreatening environment—away from the unit setting—once a week.
During our TBI Group meetings, families are encouraged to ask questions, discuss their concerns, feelings and emotions. Proactive problem solving is encouraged. The group also offers networking opportunities among family members as a means to support one another. Emotional support is offered and, most importantly, we listen. Feedback is received in an evaluation form we developed and after each group, a summary of events is kept in a journal.

The feedback received thus far is very positive and encouraging. By providing information and assistance, answering questions and offering support in a nonthreatening environment, we believe the development of the TBI Group is truly meeting the emotional and educational needs of the TBI families in the acute care setting.


Karen K. Giuliano, RN, MSN, CCRN, ACNP
Springfield, Mass.
Baystate Medical Center

Two weeks after the infrastructure for a pet visitation program was complete, a patient's significant other asked if the patient’s own pet could visit. He was surprised and quite pleased to hear that not only were pets permitted to visit in the ICU, but that a program to accommodate the visits was in place. The patient, Mr. S., was very withdrawn and appeared to respond only to photographs of his dog, which were kept at the bedside.

Ellie, his Greyhound, came to visit the next day. The staff helped her join her master right on the cardiac chair. Mr. S. did not seem to respond to her well on the initial visit. However, Ellie returned several more times and was always received with a smile and a notable increase in cognitive awareness by Mr. S. The nursing and medical staff embraced the intervention
of pet visitation and enthusiastically incorporated the new therapy into their practice, as evidenced by their support and acceptance of Ellie with each visit. The director of the ICU brought a group of interns and residents by to see “the newest form of therapy.”

Considering that Mr. S. was completely unresponsive to all nursing staff and significant others, his reaction to Ellie was quite powerful. After Mr. S. was discharged from the ICU, Ellie continued to visit him regularly on the long-term respiratory unit. He completed the process of weaning from ventilator support and was discharged home.


In the Circle: The AACN Excellent Preceptor Award


The AACN Excellent Preceptor Award is part of AACN’s Circle of Excellence recognition program. This award recognizes preceptors who demonstrate the key components of the preceptor role, including teacher, clinical role model, consultant and friend/advocate. Recipients were provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for NTI 2000 in Orlando, Fla.

The deadline to apply for Circle of Excellence Awards for 2002 is July 15, 2001. To obtain an awards guide, call (800) 899-AACN (2226) and request Item #1011, or visit the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org.

Following are excerpts from exemplars submitted by recipients of this award for 2000.


Kristin Larson, RN, BSN, CCRN
Mt. Pleasant, S.C.
Medical University
of Southern Carolina

Precepting of new employees and students is a challenging opportunity for growth. Like any talent, this skill becomes more precise and finely tuned with time.

A positive attitude and spirit of service is paramount when precepting. ICUs can be difficult environments in which to carve a niche for oneself. I have a vested interest in the success of my orientees and am cognizant that the social adaptation to the unit is as important as the mastery of the physiological concepts or tasks.

Teaching strategies I practice are based on honest and often frank conversation. Within the first week of the orientation process, I clearly state the objectives, as well as review the orientation manual. To facilitate the orientees’ knowledge, I encourage them to obtain a critical care textbook. They are given a weekly homework assignment, usually regarding a patient they have taken care of that week. These are reviewed during nonstaffing time. At this time, feedback is exchanged and new goals are established.

Although I am a structured preceptor, I am able to employ humor, positive feedback, imagery and food into the orientation. My orientees are never hungry! Breaks from the unit are necessary for the learner and, regardless of how hectic the time is, I offer them the opportunity to leave the unit for a short period of time.

Clinical competency of the orientee is my ultimate goal. He or she must be a safe practitioner. I give my orientees the commitment that, after they have completed their orientation, I will move from the role of preceptor to the role of mentor. I have been blessed with some wonderful nursing mentors who have enabled me to blossom, and I hope to give that support to those I precept.


Jann M. McCann, RN, MN, CCRN
Tacoma, Wash.
St. Clare Hospital

What struck me most about Nicole was her effervescent personality, which emanated in a love of nursing. It was clear that she was going to be an excellent, caring critical care nurse.
About halfway through her residency I was dismayed to hear Nicole talk about not working in critical care. As we were finishing a busy, task-oriented shift, she mentioned that, if this was what critical care nursing was like, she did not think it was for her.

I asked her what kind of nurse she thought I was, and asked her whether I represented the kind of nursing she wanted to do? Of course, critical care can be complex and high-tech. However, that does not overshadow the essence of nursing. We execute complicated interventions, but the caring for the patient and family does not change. I was a nurse before becoming a critical care nurse and asked her to wait, listen and learn.

Mrs. S. was an 82-year-old woman who had been admitted with respiratory distress. As I guided Nicole through her first code as team leader, I thought to myself that she is going to be able to do this. After the third code it was clear to me that Mrs. S. would not survive. Although she was a full code, I expressed to Nicole that it would be much more comfortable and loving to have her die with her sons in attendance than with a group of strangers who were trying to keep her from the inevitable.

With Nicole at my side, I explained to the family what had happened with Mrs. S. and what we had done for her. As we listened to her family members talk about her life and wishes, I clarified how she would want her life to end. Mrs. S. died with her sons at her side.
Nicole has just begun working in the unit. I am looking forward to working with my friend, watching and helping her grow, so that one day she too can help precept a new group of critical care nurses.


Tracy Spitzer, RN
Indianapolis, Ind.
Methodist Hospital

My first precepting assignment was a newly graduated RN with minimal hospital experience. What he lacked in experience, he appeared to make up for in his excitement to be a RN in our ICU. Unfortunately, as he began his orientation, we quickly realized that enthusiasm was not enough. Dan experienced difficulty in putting what he was learning into practice.

After a short time, I realized his orientation was not progressing, and we met with him multiple times to discuss learning options. We tried teaching him “his way” and “my way.” In the end, neither was working. With advice from my managers and other preceptors, I decided to extend his orientation. I was seeing now that the enthusiasm he had exhibited in the beginning no longer lit up his eyes.

After much struggle and time, I decided to give him one last shot. I gave him, and what confidence he had left, to another preceptor to try to “save” him. I assured him I would be there as a resource for him, but felt he needed to try a different approach. He agreed to move on with another preceptor. Dan eventually made it off of orientation, but he continued to struggle. After a few months, he moved on to another unit.

I now see him weekly when he is on our unit to perform hemodialysis on our patients. The best part about seeing him now is that he has that fire in his eyes again. In retrospect, I realize that I had something to do with lighting that fire, even if it wasn’t burning on our unit.


Influencing Practice: Key Influencing Skills Defined Further


The April Issue of AACN News provided a beginning road map to developing leadership skills. Four key skill sets were identified and defined as essential tools for today’s nursing leader. The Leadership Development Work Group continues to define these skill sets and their key components.The table below adds the key components of each skill set to these definitions.
Key Influencing Skills
Self-awareness
Personal wisdom; the
understanding of one’s values, beliefs and attitudes, and the impact they have on one’s responses and behaviors
Dialogue
A process to encourage the free flow of ideas within a group that seeks to discover insights that are not attainable individually to uncover a base of shared meaning
Navigating change
A deliberate process to respond to an internal or external issue or problem; diagnosing or identifying the problem or issue
Conflict Management
Working through opposing views among groups of individuals in order to reach a common goa
Key Components
Accurately assessing oneself
Being emotionally aware
Self-regulating one’s behavior
Key Components
Suspending individual judgment
Identifying and suspending assumptions
Listening
Sharing information
Inquiring
Reflecting
Key Components
Developing solutions
Overcoming resistance
Implementing change
Reestablishing balance
Key Components
Controlling emotional responses
Seeking understanding
Identifying needs and common
interests
Seeking mutual benefit
Generating solutions


In the Circle: The AACN Excellence in Leadership Award


The AACN Excellence in Leadership Award is part of AACN’s Circle of Excellence recognition program. This award recognizes nurses who demonstrate the key leadership competencies of empowerment, effective communication and continuous learning, and the effective management of change. Recipients were provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for AACN’s National Teaching Institute™ and Critical Care Exposition in May 2000 in Orlando, Fla.

The deadline to apply for Circle of Excellence Awards for 2002 is July 15, 2001. To obtain an awards guide, call (800) 899-AACN (2226) and request Item #1011, or visit the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org.

Following are excerpts from exemplars submitted by recipients of this award for 2000.


Vicki Odegaard, RN, MS, CCRN
San Antonio, Texas
Brooke Army Medical Center

Nursing leaders must continually assess what we are doing, refine our processes to improve the quality of care delivery and collaborate with those with whom we interact on a daily basis. Lead by example is my motto!

Mrs. Smith, a 68-year-old woman, had been in the surgical ICU for more than 75 days. She was alert and oriented following a difficult recovery from cardiac surgery, and continued to require mechanical ventilation. Her husband and children were having difficulty accepting that Mrs. Smith would require a stay in a long-term care facility.

Financial concerns and quality-of-life issues seemed to produce anxiety and anger for Mrs. Smith’s family. The hospital team expressed its intent to continue to follow Mrs. Smith’s progress after her departure from our hospital. When we asked Mrs. Smith her feelings regarding the move, she nodded, relaying that she wanted to be in the right place to make progress. We procured the necessary transport equipment and coordinated the transport vehicle. The transport process was reviewed with Mrs. Smith and her family. Seeing a plan come together through the concerted efforts of a skilled interdisciplinary healthcare team was truly awe inspiring.

Mrs. Smith was successfully weaned from the ventilator and discharged home. She states that the turning point of her stay at our institution was the day “that all the pieces were put together.” Through collaborative conferences and daily communication, staff must convey solidarity and unity in the messages sent to patients and their families to garner their support. As patient length of stay in our acute care hospitals has decreased and placement at the appropriate level of care is being engrained in all of us, we must not lose sight of the importance of communicating as a united team when dealing with families and patients.


Rose Rivers, RN, PhD, CNAA
Reddick, Fla.
Shands Hospital
University of Florida

I believe in transformational leadership and I see the world from an evolutionary view. I believe that life is a journey, not an event. My goal is to do the right thing, for the right reason and at the right time. I love nursing and I love nurses--and I let it show. I am committed to our vision for nursing and patient services, which I use consistently as a guide in dealing with tough decisions.
I provided leadership to create our “Integration Model.” This model was organized around four main areas of work: patient care, staff development, management systems, and quality and research. It helped us to organize our work and develop strategies to achieve our goal with one-third less people.

I created a “Two-Day RN Administrative Practicum,” which affords RNs the opportunity to spend two days with a nurse administrator. In piloting the program for one year, I was able to demonstrate that staff RNs are capable of understanding the hospital’s perspective, handling themselves professionally in the board room with the CEO and other executives, maintaining confidentiality of information, and contributing to high level discussions.

I believe that nurses are in the best position to advocate for patients, because they can and do override self-interest to determine what is in the best interest of the patient and family. Our challenge is to strengthen the role of the RN and make nursing’s contributions visible. Nurses are viewed by the public as an icon for quality. We must position ourselves to leverage this positive public opinion. We can best do this by serving in the advocacy role for the health of patients, families and communities.


Jan W. Thompson, RNC, BSN
Charlotte, N.C.
Presbyterian Hospital

Neonatology is a new, challenging and changing field of medicine. Neonatal nursing is my passion. My philosophy is that the babies come first, and that whatever is best for the baby and the family is what we seek to achieve. We are these infants’ advocates. They are the miracles, with a will to live and the strength to fight, which is a source of inspiration for those of us who work with them.

An autonomous staff is a more satisfied staff. I encourage staff members to use critical-thinking skills and empower them to make decisions that affect their practice. I ensure that they have the proper coaching and mentoring and support them in their decision making. The staff does self-scheduling. The RNs are trained to insert PICC lines. The respiratory therapists do the intubations and the staff is allowed to make appropriate patient care decisions. They accept the accountability and responsibility of primary nursing. Allowing them autonomy in their practice allows them to grow and be independent.

When we started our neonatal-pediatric transport team, I was given the opportunity to develop the program. It has been successful and offers a professional growth opportunity for our most experienced and motivated staff. Another proposal we took to our administration was to create a respiratory therapy team dedicated to the Children’s Hospital. They are a part of our team, having also been trained in nursing technician skills.

Leadership demands fairness, creativity and motivation. It means leading others, while teaching them to be independent. It involves staff input in decisions affecting their unit and their practice. Communication must be open and ongoing and the leader must be available to answer questions, mentor and coach. A staff that is independent, supported and encouraged to make decisions can manage well in the absence of their leader. Mine do.


Efforts Seek Strong Voice


AACN continually seeks avenues to strengthen the ability of critical care nurses to influence their practice and the quality of care provided for their patients and families.
As an increasingly important focus of AACN’s overall agenda, public policy priorities are identified and strategies directed at achieving this goal on a number
of fronts. For this year, AACN’s Public Policy Work Group has concentrated on the following areas:
• Increase advocacy efforts through collaboration and partnering with other organizations, especially with respect to workplace issues that challenge members today.
• Increase AACN’s visibility and voice in the policy and regulatory arena.
• Educate members, the public and decision-makers about issues that affect them.

Part of this effort has involved a series of positions that respond to member concerns surrounding a number of issues. Specifically, AACN has adopted or endorsed the following positions:
Maintaining Patient-Focused Care in an Environment of Nursing Staff Shortages and Financial Constraints

This statement, which was adopted in response to member concerns about the growing nursing shortage, is available online through the “Clinical Practice” area of the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org, or by calling Fax on Demand at (800) 222-6329. Request Document #2001. In addition, AACN joined Nurses for a Healthier Tomorrow, a coalition of nursing and other healthcare organizations, to develop a national communications campaign to attract people to the nursing profession. The campaign seeks to heighten awareness about the looming nursing shortage and to promote the excellent opportunities that await those who seek a career in nursing.

Registered Nurses and Patients Protection Act
As part of the continuing effort to promote safe work environments for patients and nurses, AACN has endorsed this federal legislation, which seeks to prohibit mandatory overtime for registered nurses and other healthcare workers.

Patients’ Bill of Rights, whistleblower/patient advocacy provision
AACN joined the American Nurses Association (ANA) in endorsing a letter supporting this provision in the Norwood/Dingall-sponsored bill.

To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System
AACN endorsed an open statement to Congress and the White House in response to this Institute of Medicine report on medical errors. AACN believes that this report provides nursing with an opportunity to articulate concerns about the present environment of care and how it directly affects the safety and quality of nursing care. AACN joined ANA and other members of the Nursing Organization Liaison Forum in signing the statement and sending a message that nursing is united in addressing this significant issue.

National Influence
Expanding its external presence and influence in the public policy arena, AACN members provided expert critical care nursing perspective at the national level. Following are some of the programs with which AACN is involved:
• Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), Organ Donation Panel Hospital Resource Guide Development.
• Division of Nursing Expert Panel on Funding Methodology for the Nursing Education and Practice Improvement Act
• HCFA National Myocardial Infarction Program
• ANA Nurse Staffing Summit
• National Nursing Leadership Academy on End-of-Life Care
• National Heart Attack Alert Program
• National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), State of the Science Conference

Liaison Relationships
AACN’s formal liaison relationships with a number of organizations also continue to grow. Among the group with which AACN collaborates are the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM), American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), American College of Nurse Practitioners (ACNP), United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and Commission on Accreditation for Medical Transport Systems (CAMTS).

For more information about AACN’s public policy initiatives, call (800) 394-5995, ext. 508, or visit the “Clinical Practice” area of the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org. Click on “Public Policy.”


Public Policy Update


Quality of Patient Care
A survey by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing found widespread concern among hospital nurses on a number of issues, including the quality of patient care and discontent in the ranks. It also identified trends that indicate there are no quick resolutions to the current nurse shortage.

University researchers questioned 43,000 nurses in 711 hospitals in the United States and in five other western nations. Many nurses said that their caseloads were increasing, that patient care had deteriorated and that they did not have time to complete basic nursing duties. One of every three U.S. nurses under age 30 reported plans to leave hospital work within a year. Only 29% of the U.S. nurses said their hospital management “listens and responds to nurses' concerns.”

“These findings suggest that nurses are doing their best, but there are simply not enough of them,” said Linda H. Aiken, one of the chief authors of the study, which was published in the May-June issue of the Health Affairs journal.

The U.S. nurses surveyed were all in Pennsylvania, which Aiken said roughly matches the mix of hospitals nationwide. Nurses in Canada, England, Scotland and Germany were also part of the study. The team of researchers conducted surveys of 13,471 acute care hospital nurses in the U.S., 17,450 in Canada, 5,006 in England, 4,721 in Scotland and 2,681 in Germany in 1998 and 1999. The investigators concluded fundamental problems with the management of care in hospitals and that working conditions for nurses are international in scope, which may contribute to medical errors and other undesirable consequences for patients.

Across the U.S., Canada, the United Kingdom and Germany specific findings included:
• As many as half of the registered nurses reported a decline in the quality of patient care provided in their hospitals within the previous year and no more than one-third judged the care provided on their units as excellent.
• Two-thirds of the nurses said there are insufficient nurses in their hospitals to provide adequate quality of care to patients.
• In the U.S. and Canada, where length of stay is shortest and home-based services are weakest, only about one-third of the nurses said they feel confident that their patients can take care of themselves after being discharged.
• In four of the five countries, including the U.S., approximately 40% of the hospital nurses reported being dissatisfied with their current jobs. The comparable statistic for professional workers in the U.S. at large was 10%.
• Consumer and provider frustration appears high, with more than half of the nurses in the U.S. and Canada reporting being verbally abused on a regular basis.

AACN has developed a background paper with information and recommendations on the nursing shortage. To obtain a copy, visit www.aacn.org and click on “Clinical Practice,” then “Public Policy.” To read the study visit www.healthaffairs.org.

Patient Outcomes and Nurse Staffing
A study released by the Health Resources and Services Administration finds a strong and consistent relationship between hospital nurse staffing levels and five outcomes in medical patients—urinary tract infection, pneumonia, shock, upper gastrointestinal bleeding and length of stay. A higher number of registered nurses was associated with a 3% to 12% reduction in the rates of these adverse outcomes, while higher staffing levels for all types of nurses were associated with a 2% to 25% decrease in these outcomes, the study found.

“This study underscores why the Bush administration budget increases funding for nurse training programs,” said HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson. “We have to take action to address the emerging nurse shortage to protect the health and well-being of all patients.”

The study, titled Nurse Staffing and Patient Outcomes in Hospitals, is based on 1997 data from more than 5 million patient discharges from 799 hospitals in 11 states. According to the study, the costs associated with patient complications can be substantial. Reductions in the rates of adverse outcomes reduce hospital costs as well as significant financial and psychological costs to patients and their families.

HHS funded this study as a result of a series of activities stemming from a 1993 congressional hearing that focused national attention on the delivery of nursing care in hospitals and its effect on patient care. Subsequently, the Institute of Medicine examined the same issues and concluded that more research was needed on the relationship between quality of patient care in hospitals and the level and mix of nurse staffing. Four HHS agencies—the Health Resources and Services Administration, Health Care Financing Administration, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the National Institute of Nursing Research of the National Institutes of Health—sponsored the study. The Harvard University School of Public Health conducted it.
Copies of the study are available on HRSA’s Web site at bhpr.hrsa.gov/dn/staffstudy.htm.

Needle Safety
Federal workplace regulations require that medical facilities across the nation to use safer syringes and blood-drawing devices took effect April 18, 2001, providing healthcare workers long-sought protections against potentially deadly needle sticks. Healthcare workers who handle needles will have more say about the safety of the devices they use under the new federal law. The new rules require medical facilities to provide employees with syringes and blood-drawing devices that retract, blunt or cover needles after use. Studies show that the safety features could eliminate up to 80% of the estimated 800,000 injuries that occur each year in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration has approved about 50 types of specially protected needles, syringes and other protective devices.

Mandated by the Needle Stick Safety and Prevention Act of 2000, the rules also require employers to seek their workers’ advice in selecting safer needles and to keep detailed logs on needle sticks so that researchers can determine ways to prevent future injuries. A federal law already sets safety standards for needles and the prevention of blood borne illnesses at healthcare facilities. The new law will reinforce the need to use safe needles to reduce injuries. OSHA is planning a 90-day education effort. OSHA officials say that, though they already cite employers that don't use safe needles and other devices, investigations usually are not conducted unless a complaint is received.

For more information on the regulations visit OSHA www.osha.gov.

FAA Requires AEDs
The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has issued a final rule requiring U.S. airlines to carry automated external defibrillators (AEDs) and enhanced emergency medical kits.
The rule applies to all airplanes flying domestic and international flights that weigh more than 7,500 pounds each and have at least one flight attendant. The airlines will have three years to comply with the new rule.

In a study published in the Oct. 26, 2000, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers had tracked the results of an American Airlines program in which flight attendants were trained in using AEDs. In the study, AEDs were used on 200 people who were experiencing cardiac arrest. Forty percent of those treated with an AED survived.

According to FAA Administrator Jane F. Garvey, nine airlines either currently carry AEDs and enhanced kits or have made a commitment to do so. Airline crewmembers will receive initial training on the emergency medical kits and on operating the AEDs. The FAA estimates that the cost to the airline industry over 10 years for equipment, medications and training at $16 million.

The rule also added several new medications to emergency medical kits that are already on board U.S. airplanes. Included are oral antihistamine, non-narcotic analgesic, aspirin, atropine, bronchodilator inhaler, lidocaine and saline, IV administration kit with connectors, AMBU bag and CPR masks. The kit currently contains a sphygmomanometer, stethoscope, three sizes of breathing tubes, syringes, needles, 50% dextrose injection, epinephrine, diphenhydramine, nitroglycerin tablets, latex gloves and basic instructions on the use of drugs in the kit.

Medical Error Reduction
Sens. Bob Graham (D-Fla.) and Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) have introduced S. 824, the Medical Error Reduction Act, a bill that would give hospitals and skilled nursing homes $97.5 million in grants from 2002-11 to offset the costs of error-reducing technology. Healthcare facilities would have the option of choosing between myriad available error-reducing technologies, including computer physician order entry, bar codes on medication packaging and patient ID bracelets, electronic medical record systems and automated pharmacy dispensing systems. The bill was referred to the Senate Finance Committee.

To read the bill, visit thomas.loc.gov.


Expanded Coverage
The final budget resolution approved by the House-Senate budget conference committee kept intact $28 billion earmarked for expansion of health insurance coverage to the uninsured. Sens. Gordon Smith, (R-Ore.) and Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) originally proposed the funds. Last-minute negotiations to distribute the money over three years, as originally intended, versus 10 years, resulted in a stipulation leaving the entire sum open for use as required tax deductions for individuals before use in any coverage measures. Nevertheless, Wyden expressed optimism that the stipulation allowed for the Senate Finance Committee and the House Ways and Means Committee to “get the job done right” and apply the money for its intended use, a blend of public and private efforts fashioned by the coalition partners to provide coverage to America’s 43 million uninsured.


Minnesota Nurses Gather to Focus on Legislative Issues

Participating in Minnesota Nurses Legislative Day were (from left) Kathleen Ohman,
Joyce Simones and Roberta Basol.



Members of the Central Minnesota Chapter of AACN joined hundreds of other nurses and nursing students for Minnesota Nurses Legislative Day in March 2001.

Roberta Basol, RN, MA, Kathleen Ohman, RN, EdD, and Joyce Simones, RN, MS, a member of the AACN Public Policy Work Group, represented the chapter at the annual event, which focused on nursing issues being proposed and debated by legislators. Keynote speaker Jim Koppel, executive director of the Children’s Defense Fund, talked about a bill that would provide universal health coverage for all Minnesota children by 2003. The nurses and students also met with their individual legislators or attended session hearings.

Legislation discussed included the Mandatory Overtime Prevention Act and the Nursing Education Act. A healthcare consumer rights and a Mental Health Act bill were also discussed.


Board Report


Following is a report by AACN Board member Connie Barden, RN, MSN, CCRN, CCNS, on discussions and actions that took place at the board’s April meeting in San Diego, Calif.

Agenda Item: Strategic Plan and Operating Plan
The board reviewed and approved the updated Strategic Plan and the 2002 Operating Plan for AACN and for AACN Certification Corporation. The Strategic Plan, which provides the overall vision and direction for the association into the future, is based on the current environmental scan and data about trends in healthcare. The board continually refers to this plan in discussing and approving association initiatives. Trend information is gleaned from a variety of sources, including surveys, work groups and other volunteer committees, focus groups and one-on-one and group discussions with members in various settings, such as Fall Regional Meetings.

Included in the Strategic Plan are organizational goals and objectives for the next three to five years. Driven by AACN’s mission, the plan focuses on meeting the needs of members in a variety of ways, including developing cutting-edge educational and practice resources and programs, advancing critical care nursing science through leadership and evidence-based practice, enhancingAACN’s role as a leader in healthcare and a voice for all nurses who care for critically ill patients, continuing to respond to the needs of all members, providing chapters with the resources and support services they need to ensure optimal operations and enhanced local-level association activities.

To obtain a copy of the full Strategic Plan, visit the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org.

Agenda Item: President’s Report
An important part of the outreach and spokesperson role that Denise Thornby, RN, MS, fills as president of AACN is meeting with AACN members, chapters and strategic partners to promote the association’s work. Thornby reported that she has met with hundreds of members this spring during her travels as president. The input and feedback from members has been very valuable and helps to validate whether AACN is undertaking initiatives that meet members’ needs.

Thornby also reported on the American College of Chest Physicians Board of Governors meeting, which she attended in March 2001. Included in the discussions at this meeting were possible ways ACCP and AACN can further forge their collaborative relationship to address the needs of both groups’ members. Thornby said ACCP is also interested in supporting efforts to address the nursing shortage.

President-Elect Michael Williams, RN, MSN, CCRN, reported to the board on the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner conference he attended in Huntsville, Ala., in March 2001. Williams noted that AACN is committed to pursuing an affiliation with the ACNP group.

Agenda Item: Operations Report
The AACN National Office leadership updated the board on the progress of their work toward achieving the association’s Strategic Plan.

The number and variety of programs and the initiatives that are under way are inspiring. Programs related to practice, research, member services, volunteer opportunities, educational resources, resource development and chapters were reviewed. On the practice front, Professional Practice Director Wendy Berke, RN, BSN, MHA, and Practice Director Justine Medina, RN, MS, reviewed several new resources, including the AACN Procedure Manual for Critical Care, 4th ed., and pocket references. It is astounding to realize the vast number of clinical resources we have available for nurses and how clearly they tie in with our priorities as outlined in the Strategic Plan.

Board member Fay Wright, RN, MS, CCRN, ACNP, and Member, Chapter, Volunteers Director Tracey Kane shared information from discussions that took place during the Board Advisory Team conference calls. Discussions focused on nursing trends at the bedside and workplace issues, as well as what participants see in their day-to-day practice. A wealth of information was obtained by talking with these members, who represented a variety of critical care practice settings. All AACN board and national office team members appreciate this type of feedback, because it truly reflects the day-to-day practice of members and draws in more than just the perspectives of the 13 board members.

Agenda Item: Budget
A significant portion of one day was spent reviewing the budget for 2002, with detailed explanations by staff and Chief Financial Officer Mike Willett. The budget that was approved for the next year is directly tied to the Strategic Plan and driven by the Operating Plan, which guides the work of the board and staff. Obviously, we must have the money to do what we decide we want to do for the year. The board was impressed by the degree of alignment between the budget and the strategic operating plan.

Agenda Item: Learning Partners
Based on feedback from previous participants, the board approved a proposal to formalize the AACN Learning Partners Program by adding board and National Teaching Institute™ partners for 2003.

Under the board program, members may apply for two learning partner positions for the fall and spring business meetings to learn more about strategic agenda items and how the board functions in its leadership role. The goal is to provide learning opportunities and a forum for exchange of ideas for both the board and the learning partners.and to promote transfer of leadership content to the learning partner’s local professional communities.

The NTI program will match learning partners with experienced presenters, who will help prepare them to present at the next NTI. The goal is to encourage development of qualified NTI speakers.

Agenda Item: Election of Secretary and Treasurer
In accordance with changes made in the method of selection of the board secretary and treasurer, the board elected Lori Hendrickx, RN, EdD, CCRN, as secretary for the coming year and Jessica Palmer, RN, MSN, to a second term as board treasurer.

Agenda Item: Nursing Shortage
Setting aside time at each meeting for strategic thinking and dialogue is important to the effectiveness of the board. At this meeting, two topics important in today’s healthcare environment were discussed—the nursing shortage and leadership succession.

With respect to the nursing shortage, the discussion focused on specific ways in which AACN is actively addressing changes in the healthcare environment, as well as on feedback from members. As a leader in healthcare, AACN has been responding to this issue in many ways. Various documents are available, including a resource titled Staffing Blueprint: Constructing Your Staffing Solutions and a statement titled “Maintaining Patient-Focused Care in an Environment of Nursing Staff Shortages and Financial Constraints.” The importance of communicating these resources and other activities to members was stressed and several documents to describe AACN’s involvement were reviewed. Included was a one-page, bulleted information sheet, which would be a concise way to educate anyone, not just members, about AACN activities, as well as strategies that can be undertaken by individual nurses to increase the supply of critical care nurses.

Agenda Item: Leadership Succession
In discussing leadership planning for AACN, emphasis was placed on ensuring strong leadership for the organization at all levels, national and local, by enhancing and integrating leadership development strategies in everything the association does. Viewing leadership development as a directed journey, the needs were seen on a continuum that will differ for different individuals and groups.

With an emphasis on leadership development, strategies to make volunteer opportunities available to a broad segment of the membership were discussed. The Chapter Leadership Development Workshop at the NTI in May 2001 in Anaheim, Calif., is an example of the commitment AACN has to developing future leaders. Approximately 200 chapter leaders attended the workshop. Volunteer committees, including work groups, task forces and advisory teams, are another way members can learn leadership skills, while contributing to the work of AACN.

Agenda Item: AJCC Task Force
Part of AACN’s Strategic Plan is to evaluate creative methods for combining research findings and evidence-based practice with readability that encourages its use at the bedside. Toward that end, the board approved the convening of a task force to examine the American Journal of Critical Care. All AACN publications undergo periodic review to assess their continued relevancy in meeting the needs of members.


In the Circle: The Excellence in Management Award

The AACN Excellence in Management Award is part of AACN’s Circle of Excellence recognition program. This award recognizes nurse managers who demonstrate excellence in coordination of available resources to efficiently and effectively care for acute or critically ill patients and families. Successful applicants address how they promote an environment of professional involvement, development and accountability; collaborative problem solving; empowerment; leadership to transform thinking; structures and processes to address opportunities and challenges; and communication, as well as how they serve as a catalyst for successful change. Recipients were provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

The deadline to apply for Circle of Excellence Awards for 2002 is July 15, 2001. To obtain an awards guide, call (800) 899-AACN (2226) and request Item #1011, or visit the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org.

Following are excerpts from exemplars submitted by recipients of this award for 2000.


Marjorie Avery, RN, BSN, MS
Fairfax, Va.
Inova Fairfax Hospital
After more than 20 years in nursing, I think I have the most challenging and fulfilling job thus far. I have the privilege of leading a highly evolved staff in the trauma-neurology ICU of a Level One Trauma Center. Although I have had various management positions, this is my first clinical leadership position. I had been away from the ICU setting for approximately 10 years. My strategy was to update my clinical skills first. I worked side by side with my staff to become clinically competent again. I am amazed at the level of intelligence and scope of skills required of today’s ICU nurse. I enjoy my time working at the bedside with my staff. We are developing relationships that are built on trust, respect and honest, two-way communication.

I have an open-door practice and staff members frequently drop in. I am careful not to share my anxiety about deadlines with them, but give them my full attention. It takes creative juggling on my part, but I figure out how to meet the deadlines and make staff feel they are heard, supported and appreciated.

I lead by example. I project calmness when there is a storm. I think before I speak. I listen. I gently guide. I support. I understand. I have been there. I maintain and inject a sense of humor into situations. I firmly believe that laughter is the best medicine and have an optimistic approach to life. This proves to be quite infectious with staff and can quickly redirect some frustrations. I want my staff to succeed and to enjoy working in this trauma ICU.


Cheryl Kirby, RN, BSN, CCRN
Carrollton, Texas
Methodist Medical Center

Cheryl Kirby is a nurse manager with a background in the corporate setting. She has had experience managing employees for such companies as Ralston Purina, Precision Tooling Incorporated and C. E. Riggs and Assoc., and has been a nurse manager in two separate facilities. She has been a critical care nurse for 16 years.

Cheryl’s facility was recently assessed by a productivity company, which required that the entire staffing framework be changed. Cheryl addressed this challenge by sharing the expected changes with her staff, particularly the charge nurses, and making them responsible for the implementation. Obtaining their “buy-in” resulted in a relatively easy transition in the 19-bed neurology critical care and intermediate care area.

Shortly after the change was implemented, Cheryl assumed the interim position of nurse manager for the CCU as well. In this unit, the process had not been implemented and the charge nurses had not been involved in the initiative. By giving the charge nurses ownership, Cheryl was able to turn this unit over to the new manager in close compliance with the new staffing requirements.

Cheryl was then asked to become nurse manager of the 26-bed ICU, which meant that she would have more than 85 employees reporting directly to her. She agreed and once again found that the unit had not implemented the productivity process. At this time Cheryl is working closely with the ICU charge nurses to implement the program and is achieving significant results. Her ability to involve the staff in ownership of the process has been instrumental in making it successful in each of her units.


Jackie S. Yon, RN, MS, CCRN, CCNS
Lakeland, Fla.
Lakeland Regional Medical Center

I believe that our healthcare system is driven by the needs of patients where critical care nurses make their optimal contribution. Let me share with you why this is true.

As a critical care manager for the past 24 years, my greatest challenge has been staffing. I’ve had too many staff and not enough staff, never experiencing the right numbers at the right time. Our environment is often seasonal, so our census goes from fast and frantic to the “who’s taking off today” syndrome. I looked for opportunities to cross-train our staff to less acute, but highly technical areas that need critical care skills. This keeps staff from burning out during high season and provides work hours during low census. As the acuity and procedures grew intense in our procedural based units, it was easy to “sell” our staff’s expertise to fill vacancies or vacations during the summer lull.

We cross-trained our staff in the recovery room to recover patients, in the vascular lab and in the electrodiagnostics department to monitor conscious sedation. Our greatest challenge came when our chief cardiac surgeon suggested that we train our surgical ICU staff to circulate into the operating room and then recover the patient in the surgical ICU. Could we convince a few of the surgical ICU RNs to take this leap of faith? We did, and the cardiovascular operating room manager and I now “share” the RNs hours and their skills. Providing this continuum of care to a patient is very satisfying to the staff. They know the patient inside and out!

The medical ICU staff is now involved in this process and we continue to expand our horizons. We’re in the cardiac catheterization lab now

Looking Ahead

June 2001

June 15 Deadline to submit nominations for candidates for the AACN Board of Directors, AACN Nominating Committee and AACN Certification Corporation Board of Directors.
Forms can be obtained by calling (800) 899-2226 and requesting Item #1540, or via the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org. Click on “Membership,” then
“Volunteer Opportunities.”

June 22 Deadline to submit applications for the 2001-02 AACN Wyeth-Ayerst Nursing Fellows Program. To obtain an application call AACN Fax on Demand at (800) 222-6329 and
request Document #2005. Applications are also available online at www.aacn.org. Click on “Membership.” then “Awards, Grants, Scholarships.”

June 30 Deadline to take advantage of three-person group discount offer to take the CCRN certification exam. For more information, call (800) 899-2226.


July 2001

July 1 Deadline to submit proposals for AACN Clinical Inquiry Grants. To obtain an application, call AACN Fax on Demand at (800) 222-6329 and request Document
1013, or visit the “Clinical Practice” area of the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org. Click on “Research.”

July 1 Deadline to submit proposals for Medtronic Physio-Control-AACN Small Grants Program. To obtain an application, call AACN Fax on Demand at
(800) 222-6329 and request Document #1013, or visit the “Clinical Practice” area of the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org. Click on “Research.”

July 15 Deadline to submit nominations for 2002 Circle of Excellence Awards. For more information or to obtain an awards booklet, call (800) 899-2226 and request Item #1011, or
visit the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org. Click on “Membership,” then “Awards.”


August 2001

Aug. 15 Deadline to apply for ICU Design Citation, cosponsored by AACN, the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) and the American Institute of Architects Academy on Architecture for Health. For more information or to obtain an awards booklet, call (800) 899-2226, or visit the AACN Web site at www.aacn.org. Click on “Membership,”then “Awards.”
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