AACN News—April 2002—Association News

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Vol. 19, No. 4, APRIL 2002


Circle of Excellence Award Recipients Will Be Recognized at 2002 NTI in Atlanta: Nominate Yourself or a Colleague for a 2003 Award

Each year, individuals and groups who have made a difference in critical care nursing practice are honored as recipients of AACN’s Circle of Excellence awards. Some of these awards applaud exceptional practice in the most intimate of settings. Others recognize lengthy and far-reaching contributions that are in step with AACN’s vision.

Tribute will be paid to all of these 2002 Circle of Excellence Award recipients at AACN’s 2002 National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition, May 4 through 9 in Atlanta, Ga. Among them are the recipients of the prestigious AACN-Marguerite Rodgers Kinney Award for a Distinguished Career and the Ross Products-AACN Pioneering Spirit Award. Brief information about each of these recipients follows.

Other awards, many sponsored by AACN’s Partners With Industry companies, focus on education, leadership, clinical practice, community service, mentoring, preceptorship, innovation and multidisciplinary team efforts. Honorary and lifetime membership awards are also available each year. Descriptions of each of the available awards as well as a list of the recipients for 2002 appear below.

July 15, 2002, is the deadline to nominate yourself or a colleague for the 2003 awards.

AACN-Marguerite Rodgers Kinney Award for a Distinguished Career

Named in honor of AACN Past President Marguerite R. Kinney, the AACN award recognizes individuals who are completing or have completed an extraordinary and distinguished professional career that has enhanced the care of acute and critically ill patients and their families by furthering the mission and vision of AACN. To recognize the selfless contributions recipients of this award have made throughout their careers, a gift of $1,000 is made to a charitable cause of their choice. Recipients are also given lifetime membership in the association and a replica of the crystal AACN presidential Vision icon.

Receiving this award for 2002 is Luther Christman, RN, PhD, FAAN, who has worked tirelessly throughout his career to improve the lives of patients and families by developing innovative models for care delivery and interdisciplinary problem solving that were ahead of their time. His varied and colorful career portrays the evolution of American nursing during the second half of the 20th century.

As a clinician, educator, researcher and administrator, Christman is adamant that patient care is a nurse’s primary role, and that all the other roles primarily support and enhance what clinicians do. He is perhaps best known for developing the Rush Unification Model, which embodies his vision of nurses as knowledge workers and full partners in care delivery. This model fully integrated practice, education and research at Chicago’s Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center, transforming patient care and nursing. Because physicians and other professionals sensed that something new and different was happening, they supported Christman and his innovative strategies.

Although Christman retired in 1987, capping 48 years of contributions to nursing, his voice continues to challenge the profession. To this day, hundreds of nurse leaders in the United States and across the world credit Luther Christman and the Rush model as having the greatest influence on their commitment to the care of critically ill patients and families.

Timeless concepts developed by Christman in 1982 are featured in Critical Care Nurse. The first are in an article titled “Christman’s Survival Kit for Nurse Managers,” which appears in the April 2002 issue.

Ross Products-AACN Pioneering Spirit Award

Cosponsored by the Ross Products Division of Abbott Laboratories, this award recognizes timely and far-reaching contributions that exemplify a pioneering spirit and influence the direction of acute and critical care nursing. These contributions support the mission, vision and values of AACN and have a regional or national impact. Recipients are presented a plaque and $500 honorarium as well as complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

Receiving the Ross Products-AACN Pioneering Spirit Award for 2002 are:

Diane M. Billings

Diane M. Billings, RN, BSN, EdD, FAAN, is internationally applauded as a pioneer and expert in using educational technology to help nurses learn anytime, anywhere. She describes her many volunteer roles as a longtime member of AACN as “my anchor to the realities of clinical practice, where the nurses I teach will make their optimal contribution to patient care.” This synergy has led to far-reaching innovations that make knowledge accessible for acute and critical care nurses.

Always an early adopter of new technologies, Billings has fostered an atmosphere of creativity and innovation in educational technology. She guided AACN’s entry into computer-assisted instruction and, between 1987 and 1995, served on the education, competency and essentials task forces. Last year alone with her guidance, Indiana University originated 53 Web courses serving 844 students, nine Web-enhanced courses serving 97 students and 12 telecourses serving 105 students. Her vision led to a partnership among Indiana University, Clarian Health and AACN that secured $2.1 million in funding and that is now developing a community of learning for critical care nursing as a model of online nursing education.

Hundreds of nurse educators owe their knowledge of educational technology to Billings and the Center for Teaching and Lifelong Learning, a renowned learning laboratory and an innovative computer cluster for allied health sciences at Indiana University. In addition, she has coordinated national conferences where educators learn to design Web-based courses and twice cochaired Sigma Theta Tau International’s InfoExpo, which brought national visibility to the vast potential of advances in educational technology.

Bernice Buresh and Suzanne Gordon

Bernice Buresh’s and Suzanne Gordon’s tireless commitment to ensuring a successful future for nurses is driven by their profound belief that, without the unique contribution of its nurses, no country would be genuinely healthy. As professional journalists, they have dedicated a significant part of their careers to helping nurses learn how to work effectively with the media. At the same time, they have helped their media colleagues and the public learn about nurses’ contributions to national health and the appropriateness of using nurses as content experts when preparing media reports. They write about nursing, healthcare and the need to make contemporary nursing visible in the media and understood by the general public.

The hundreds of articles that Buresh and Gordon have written individually and together have appeared in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Boston Globe, the Milwaukee Sentinel, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Washington Post, Newsweek, Time, the American Journal of Nursing, the Canadian Nurse, Revolution, Image, Journal of Nursing Scholarship and Nursing Management.
A former Washington, D.C., bureau chief for Newsweek magazine, Buresh became interested in nursing while covering stories about the causes and effects of the under-representation of women and their work in the media. She believes that nurses must have public support to continue to provide high-quality care, especially in the face of a global shortage of nurses. However, she says that there must be a greater understanding of the breadth and complexity of nursing work and the resources that are needed if nurses are to provide knowledgeable care giving. Nurses are often the last ones to explain what they do and how their practice and research innovations address the major health challenges of the time, she says.

Gordon writes about political culture, women’s issues, nursing and healthcare. For the past 14 years, she has observed nurses and other caregivers in hospitals and healthcare institutions across the United States and has written about care giving and healthcare reform issues. She is the author of more than 250 articles and five books and coeditor of three other books. While writing her best-selling book, Life Support: Three Nurses on the Front Line, she followed three nurses at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, Mass., to provide a “nurse’s eye” view of today’s healthcare system. Gordon is a frequent speaker at the NTI and will deliver the Tuesday keynote address at the 2002 NTI.

Buresh’s and Gordon’s relationship with AACN began in the early 1990s as media trainers working first with the president of AACN and later with all members of the AACN Board of Directors. AACN provided them publishing and distribution support when, through the Women in Journalism Project, they developed a comprehensive national resource directory of expert nurses for journalists.
Their latest book, From Silence to Voice: What Nurses Know and Must Communicate to the Public, is both a call to action and a how-to guide. In addition to documenting the causes and impacts of nursing’s lack of visibility, it helps nurses learn how to take advantage of opportunities to speak out in public to reach the media on issues that are important to patients and to the profession.

Steven Finkler

Steven Finkler is credited with making financial management knowledge readily accessible and understandable to nurses. He is one of the first experts in business and finance to invest talent and time into helping professional nurses acquire knowledge and skill about the business side of healthcare. Because of the extraordinary financial resources needed to care for critically ill patients and their families, Finkler’s contributions have had an especially favorable impact on the success of nurse managers and administrators in critical care.

Budgeting Concepts for Nurse Managers, published in 1984, is now in its third edition. Financial Management for Nurse Managers and Nurse Executives, coauthored with nurse Christine Kovner and published in 1993, is now in its second edition. Hundreds of nurse managers and executives have attended his twice-yearly seminars on budgeting at the Wagner School of Public Service at New York University, where he is professor of public and health administration, accounting and financial management. As a faculty mentor in the Wharton-Johnson & Johnson program, he has guided dozens of nurse executives over the years.

Finkler’s pioneering work with nurses also extends into research, dating back 20 years when interdisciplinary research teams in nursing were uncommon. His name has appeared alongside those of well-known critical care nurse researchers, including Dorothy Brooten. He has been a coinvestigator on numerous studies, including the pioneering studies of the impact of advanced practice nurses on clinical outcomes of low-birth-weight infants. For the past four years, Finkler has served as a member of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research at the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute for Nursing Research.

Vee Rice and Penny Vaughan
 

Vee Rice, RN, MSN, PhD, and Penny Vaughan, RN, MSN, truly exemplify the creative and entrepreneurial spirit of critical care nurses. Working in tandem for most of their careers, they are especially recognized for two contributions that continue to make clinical knowledge widely accessible to critical care nurses. First, they brought to sustained maturity the first comprehensive critical care education program in the world. Next, they served as founding editors of the journal Critical Care Nurse.

Rice and Vaughan have each directed the Tennessee-based Critical Care Program, which continues to be the gold standard for regional critical care nurse preparation in not only Tennessee but also southern Kentucky and northern Alabama. Developed in 1971 by AACN cofounder Norma Shepard, RN, BS, the program has been used as a model for many consortium-based orientation programs across the United States. Vaughan, also an AACN cofounder, credits Shepard not only for the vision and commitment that inspired this future-oriented program, but for the charisma that attracted the best and brightest clinicians to critical care.

Rice and Vaughan have each contributed as program developers, educational administrators, clinicians and mentors to program participants, successfully sustaining, evolving and redesigning the program to consistently present the best of critical care practice. Today, more than 5,000 nurses have completed the program, which is approved for both continuing education and academic credit. Rice and Vaughan are recognized in many countries for their expertise and have traveled extensively to share their program development and teaching knowledge with others. They have inspired hundreds of these nurses to advance their preparation, often seeking CCRN certification and advanced clinical degrees.

In addition, Rice and Vaughan are the founding coeditors of Critical Care Nurse, one of the world’s first specialty periodicals for nurses. They recognized the need for a peer-reviewed publication that focused on patient care issues unique to the care of critically ill patients and their families. Previously, nurses seeking up-to-date knowledge to support their practice were limited to reading the occasional critical care article in general nursing publications and adapting content from journals for physicians.

As the editors, Rice and Vaughan continually disseminated high-quality articles on critical care nursing practice, standards and innovations. This contribution to the body of critical care knowledge is highly regarded around the world as the essential knowledge resource for clinical practitioners in critical care. Rice and Vaughan set a standard of consistent editorial accuracy and excellence that was confirmed by its popularity among clinicians. This standard greatly influenced AACN’s decision to acquire Critical Care Nurse as an official publication for its members in 1992.


Congratulations to Award Recipients for 2002: Nominate Yourself or a Colleague for a 2003 Award

The AACN Circle of Excellence recognition program honors individuals who have made a difference in healthcare, and the lives of patients and their families. Sponsored by AACN and its Partners With Industry companies, the awards applaud excellence, honor leadership and show appreciation for the dedication of nurses whose contributions and achievements exemplify AACN’s mission and vision.
The recipients will be recognized at AACN’s National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition, May 4 through 9, 2002, in Atlanta, Ga.

July 15, 2002, is the deadline to nominate yourself or a colleague for a 2003 Circle of Excellence award. Following is information about these awards, as well as the Circle of Excellence award recipients for 2002.

AACN Lifetime Member Award
This award recognizes AACN members who have rendered distinguished service to the association and demonstrated potential for continuing contributions to acute and critical care nursing through AACN. In addition to lifetime AACN membership, recipients are presented a personalized plaque as well as complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

The AACN Lifetime Member Award recipients for 2002 are:

Elizabeth Nolan, RN, MS, CS
Ann Arbor, Mich.
CardioVascular Center
University of Michigan Hospital and Health System

Michael L. Williams, RN, MSN, CCRN
Ypsilanti, Mich.
Eastern Michigan University

AACN Mentoring Award
This award recognizes individuals or groups who develop and enhance another’s intellectual and technical skills, acculturating them to the professional community, and modeling a way of life and professional achievement. Recipients are presented a personalized plaque.

Recipients of the award for 2002 are:

Damon B. Cottrell, RN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, CEN
Dallas, Texas
Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas

DaiWai Olson, RN, BSN, CCRN
Durham, N.C.
Duke University Hospital

Linda Sullivan, RN
Albuquerque, N.M.
University of New Mexico Hospital

AACN Excellence in Caring Practices Award
Presented in honor of John Wilson Rodgers, this award recognizes nurses whose caring practices embody AACN’s vision of creating a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and families. Successful applicants empower patients and families by helping them to understand and cope with illness; offering them avenues or possibilities of understanding; increasing their control and acceptance of a difficult experience; and demonstrating vigilance, persistence and commitment to their well-being. They also make the patient’s challenges approachable and manageable through his or her own ability to face and cope with the problem. Recipients demonstrate how they have encompassed the AACN Values and Ethic of Care in their work. They receive complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

The recipients for 2002 are:

Cindy Damboise, RN, BSN, CCRN
Stevenson Ranch, Calif.
Providence Holy Cross Medical Center

Karen N. Hamilton, RNC, CEN, CCRN, MICN, CFRN, NREMT-P, CCEMT-P
Manassas, Va.
Aeromedical Transport Specialist

Megan Rehwoldt, RN, BSN
Foothill Ranch, Calif.
Mission Hospital

Maureen A. Seckel, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS
Newark, Del.
Christiana Care Health Services

Michele J. Young, RN
Richmond, Va.
Health Systems/MVC Hospitals and Physicians

Oridion-AACN Excellent Clinical Nurse Specialist Award

Sponsored by Oridion Medical, this award recognizes acute and critical care nurses who function as clinical nurse specialists. Applicants must be CCNS certified. Recipients demonstrate the key components of advanced practice nursing, including: leadership, advanced practice clinical skills, research application, evidence-based practice, outcome-focused practice, cost containment, quality assurance, mentoring, problem solving and communication with patients, families, staff and systems. In addition, they illustrate how they have been a catalyst for successful change. Recipients are provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI. The recipients for 2002 are:

Karen K. Giuliano, RN, MSN, CCRN, CCNS
Atkinson, N.H.
Philips Medical Systems
and Boston College School of Nursing

Roberta Kaplow, RN, PhD, CCNS, CCRN
New York, N.Y.
Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

AACN Excellent Nurse Practitioner Award
This award recognizes acute and critical care nurses who function as nurse practitioners. These practitioners demonstrate the key components of advanced practice nursing. including leadership, advanced practice clinical skills, research application, evidence-based practice, outcome-focused practice, cost containment, quality assurance, mentoring, problem solving and communication with patients, families, staff and systems. In addition, they illustrate how they have served as a catalyst for successful change. Recipients receive complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI, which features the API. Recipients for 2002 are:

Patricia Long, RN, MSN, ACNP
Long Beach, Calif.
Long Beach Memorial Heart Institute

Tamara L. Philpott, RN, MSN, CCNP-BS, CCRN
Josephine, Texas
Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas

Sophia Chu Rodgers, RN, MSN, NP-C, ACNP
Albuquerque, N.M.
Lovelace Health Systems

Eli Lilly-AACN Excellent Preceptor Award

Sponsored by Eli Lilly & Company, this award recognizes preceptors who demonstrate the key components of the preceptor role including teacher, clinical role model, consultant and friend/advocate. Recipients are provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

Recipients for 2002 are:

Carl L. Deal, RN, BSN, CCRN
West Salisbury, Pa.
West Virginia University Hospital

Lisa Marie Noe, RN
Philadelphia, Pa.
Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania

Eugenia C. Welch, RN, CCRN
Combine, Texas
Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas

3M Health Care-AACN Excellence in Clinical Practice Award

Sponsored by 3M Health Care, this award recognizes acute and critical care nurses who embody, exemplify and excel at the clinical skills and principles that are required in their practice. Recipients address how they have successfully integrated standards of care; patient advocacy; holistic care; collaboration and coordination of care; leadership; inquiry and critical thinking; values; and ethics into their practice. The recipients are provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

Recipients for 2002 are:

Dea Ann L. Martin, RN, BSN, CCRN
Allen, Texas
Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas

Kate McCarthy, RN, BSN, CCRN
Tallahassee, Fla.
Tallahassee Memorial Hospital

Debra Pronitis-Ruotolo, RN, BSN, CCRN
Dallas, Texas
Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas

Steven Savant, RN, BSN, CCRN
Lafayette, La.
Lafayette, General Medical Center

Capt. Erica Spillane, RNC, CCRN, MHR
Landstuhl, Germany
Landstuhl Regional Medical Center


AACN Excellence in Clinical Practice—Non-Traditional Setting
This award is designed to recognize excellence in the care of critically ill patients in environments outside of the traditional ICU/CCU setting. These recipients demonstrate how they have successfully integrated the following into their practice: standards of care; patient advocacy; holistic care; collaboration and coordination of care; leadership; inquiry and critical thinking; ethics; and values values, as they care for critically ill patients in settings outside the walls of traditional critical care units. Eligible applicants include, but are not limited to nurses working in, home healthcare, progressive care, telemetry, step-down, catheterization labs and emergency departments. Recipients are given complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.

Recipients for 2002 are:

John Kelly, RN, BSN, CCRN, CFRN, CEN, EMT-P
Auburn. Mass.
Hartford Hospital

Nancy R. Simpson, RN, MSN, CCRN, EMT
Loudon, Tenn.
University Of Tennessee Medical Center

Olinda Pando Spitzer, RN, BSN, CCRN
McKinney, Texas
North Central Medical Center

Bard-AACN Excellence in Education Award

Sponsored by Bard Medical Division, this award recognizes nurse educators who facilitate the acquisition and advancement of the knowledge and skills required for competent practice and positive patient outcomes in the care of acute and critically ill patients and their families. Recipients are provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.
Recipients for 2002 are:

Jenny Hamner, RN, DSN, CCRN
Roanoke, Ala.
Auburn University School of Nursing

Deanna L. Reising, RN, PhD, CS
Bloomington, Ind.
Indiana University School of Nursing

Jennifer Sandoval, RN, MSN, PhD
Greensboro, N.C.
University of North Carolina at
  Greensboro

AACN InnoVision Award
This award recognizes initiatives and programs that innovatively and collaboratively meet the needs of families of the acute and critically ill. Up to three awards, with $2,500 earmarked to fund projects, are granted to partnerships that include an AACN member, a healthcare provider organization and a community group. In addition, individual recipients are given public recognition and a personalized plaque.
There are no recipients of this award for 2002.

AACN Excellence in Leadership Award
This award recognizes nurses who demonstrate the leadership competencies of empowerment, effective communication and continuous learning, and the effective management of change. Recipients are provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.
Recipients for 2002 are:

Elsie B. Croom, RN, BSN, CCRN
Lafayette, La.
Lafayette General Medical Center

Elizabeth Shaw, RN, MSN
Scott AFB, Ill.

Maria Shirey, RN, MS, MBA, CHE, CNAA
Evansville, Ind.
Deaconess Hospital

AACN Excellent Student Nurse Award
This award recognizes nursing students whose activities during nursing school have promoted the value of nursing and reflect the AACN vision of creating a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and families, where critical care nurses can make their optimal contribution. Recipients show how their leadership has transformed thinking, structures or process to address opportunities and challenges, as well as how they collaborated with key stakeholders to create synergistic relationships to promote common interests and shared values. Individual students or groups of students are eligible to apply. Recipients receive a complimentary three-year AACN membership.
The recipient for 2002 is:

Paul T. Ladwig, RN, BSN, EMT-P
Livermore, Calif.
California State University, Hayward

AACN Multidisciplinary Team Award
This award recognizes a multidisciplinary team that clearly practices key principles of collaboration and multidisciplinary practice. Up to three awards are given to multidisciplinary teams, with $2,500 earmarked to fund projects. In addition, individual recipients are given public recognition and a personalized plaque.
Recipients for 2002 are:

5LM Cardiovascular Surgical Telemetry Unit
Milwaukee, Wisc.
St. Luke’s Medical Center Milwaukee

Acute Coronary Syndrome Team
New York, N.Y.
New York-Presbyterian Hospital,
  Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center

MICU Hanavirus Care Team
Albuquerque, N.M.
University of New Mexico Hospital

Marsh-AACN Community Service Award

Cosponsored by Marsh, this award recognizes significant service by acute and critical care nurses, as individuals or in groups, who make a contribution to their community. Individuals or groups selected receive a complimentary registration to the NTI, or they may choose up to $500 toward speaker fees for an educational symposium.
Recipients for 2002 are:

Elizabeth A. Hupp, RN, MA
Morgantown, W. Va.
WVU Department of Surgery
ICU Education Team
Portsmouth, Ohio
Southern Ohio Medical Center

Mark R. Kurland, RN, BSN, CCRN
Dallas, Texas
Medical City Dallas

AACN Excellent Nurse Manager Award
This award recognizes nurse managers who demonstrate excellence in coordination of available resources to efficiently and effectively care for acute or critically ill patients and families. Recipients address how they promote an environment of professional involvement, development and accountability; collaborative problem solving; empowerment; leadership to transform thinking; structures and processes to address opportunities and challenges; and communication, as well as how they serve as a catalyst for successful change. Recipients are provided complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.
Recipients for 2002 are:

Carol Fevurly Cleek, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS
Olathe, Kan.
Olathe Medical Center

Kay Clevenger, RN, MSN
Indianapolis, Ind.
Clarian Health

Ray Quintero, RN, MSN, CCRN
Yorktown, Va.
Virginia Commonwealth University
  Health System

Media Award
This award recognizes print, broadcast and Web-based media excellence in the portrayal of healthcare providers, especially acute and critical care nurses contributing to a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and families. Successful entries present relevant nursing and healthcare topics to large audiences of consumers, including the general public, patients and families. Accuracy, realism and technical qualities are important factors in the selection of entries.
AACN members and chapters, as well as editors, publishers, producers, marketing and public relations specialists, universities and institutional communications departments are eligible to apply. Entries must have been published or broadcast between Nov. 1 of the previous year and the time of submission. Entries must include documentation verifying the publication/broadcast and size of audience.
A personalized plaque is presented to winning entries. Awards are announced in AACN publications and at the NTI. The deadline to submit Media Award materials is Nov. 1, 2002.
Recipients for 2002 are:

Southern New Hampshire Chapter of AACN
Manchester, N.H.

Jon Tevlin
Star Tribune
Minneapolis, Minn.

AACN Distinguished Research Lecturer Award
This award honors a nationally known researcher, who presents the annual Distinguished Research Lecture at the NTI. The lecturer receives an honorarium of $1,000, as well as $1,000 toward NTI expenses.
The recipient of the award for 2002, who is presenting the lecture at the 2002 NTI in Atlanta, Ga., is:

Barbara Drew, RN, PhD, FAAN
San Francisco, Calif.
University of California, San Francisco
School of Nursing
Department of Physiological Nursing

AACN Excellence in Research Award
This award recognizes nurse researchers who are furthering the mission, vision and research priorities of AACN through their research. Successful applicants will describe their studies and how the results will influence the practice of critical care nursing, specifically its impact on patients and families. Research projects must have been completed within the year that the application is submitted. Recipients of AACN research grants or NTI research abstract award recipients are not eligible for this award. Recipients receive complimentary registration, airfare and hotel accommodations for the NTI.
There were no recipients of this award for 2002.


To obtain an awards guide, call (800) 899-2226 (request Item #1011), or visit the AACN Web site.

AACN Seeks Leaders to Step Into National Roles: Postmark Nominations by June 14

AACN is seeking nominations of individuals to serve on the national AACN Board of Directors and the AACN Nominating Committee for terms that begin July 1, 2003. Available positions are for the office of president-elect and for four director positions on the AACN board, as well as for three positions on the AACN Nominating Committee. In addition, nominations for chair-elect and for three director positions on the AACN Certification Corporation board are invited. (See page 11 for additional information about the AACN Certification Corporation positions.)

Nominations must be received or postmarked by June 14, 2002. Nomination forms can be obtained by calling (800) 394-5995, ext. 307, or via the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org > Call for Nominations.

Individuals selected to serve in these important positions have the opportunity to share the talent and knowledge they have developed as leaders in the association, in their professions and in their communities, and to help shape the future of critical care nursing practice.

Nominees for AACN positions must be AACN national members. Time commitments and support services for each position may differ. Travel and other expenses are reimbursed for all of these national volunteer positions.

Following are brief descriptions of these positions:

AACN Board of Directors
President-elect (one, 1-Year Term)—Nominees must have served at least two years on the AACN Board of Directors. During the term, the president-elect works to become familiar with the duties of the president and consults with the president to prepare for continuity and a smooth transition of leadership.

The president-elect also assumes presidential accountability in the absence or inability of the president to act. From the nominations submitted, the Board of Directors selects the candidate who is placed on the ballot.

Directors (four, 3-Year Terms)—In addition to representing the needs of the members, board directors establish priorities for AACN, based on its mission and vision. They help to ensure general and financial viability and growth of the association, and the maintenance of successful relationships between AACN and AACN Certification Corporation. The position also affords numerous opportunities to network with professional colleagues, consumers and healthcare policymakers.

AACN Nominating Committee
(Three, 1-Year Terms)—In collaboration with appointed members from the AACN Board of Directors and representatives of AACN Certification Corporation, Nominating Committee members develop and submit the slate of AACN candidates for election by the AACN membership at large. A process based on the AACN Leadership Framework is used to assess the nominees’ competencies before submitting the slate of candidates to a vote by the membership.

Mission, Vision and Values Evident in Choosing Future Leaders

By Sandra Cunningham, RN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, CS
Michael Day, RN, MSN, CCRN
Mary Lou Warren, RN, MSN, CCRN, CS, CNS
AACN Nominating Committee

The continued success of AACN as a leader in critical care nursing is imbedded in the annual nomination process and the willingness of qualified member leaders to step forward to fill positions on the AACN Board of Directors and AACN Certification Corporation Board of Directors, as well as on the AACN Nominating Committee.

As members of the AACN Nominating Committee for 2001-02, we had the opportunity to review first-hand the impressive caliber of individuals nominated for these positions and to observe how the mission, vision and values of AACN are supported in the nominating process.

Have you had an interest in seeking one of these national-level offices, but were unsure about the process you would face? By sharing our experiences, we hope to provide you insight of what can be expected.
The Nominating Committee is accountable for recommending the slate of candidates to be placed on the ballot for the AACN Board Of Directors and for the AACN Nominating Committee. Through a separate but parallel process, the committee also develops the candidate slate for the AACN Certification Corporation Board of Directors, which is approved by the AACN Board of Directors.

Chaired by immediate Past President Denise Thornby, RN, MS, the Nominating Committee is comprised of three members who are elected by the association’s general membership and representatives of both the AACN board and the AACN Certification Corporation board. Two additional members were appointed to participate in the AACN Certification Corporation nominating process. The composition of the committee provides for a unique balance and insight during the candidate selection process.

The nominating process itself exemplifies the mission, vision and values of AACN. For us, understanding the mission, vision and values and how they relate to the work of the association was essential. In addition, AACN’s Leadership Framework was important in identifying the essential characteristics needed to provide optimal support of AACN:

• Ambassador skills encompass the characteristics and behaviors that sustain collegial relationships, generate commitment, resolve conflicts and facilitate collaboration. Leaders with strong ambassador skills connect with others in a meaningful way and inspire others in achieving personal and collective goals.
• Intellectual skills are demonstrated through prioritization and translation of information to others. Leaders with strong intellectual skills synthesize complex information and have the ability to set a context or framework of the work that needs to be done.

Our committee was faced with an early challenge when travel to our first meeting, scheduled for October, was cancelled following the Sept. 11 tragedy. However, through creativity and perseverance, the Nominating Committee was able to accomplish the necessary work via a series of telephone conference calls.

Prior to the telephone conference, each member of the Nominating Committee reviewed the written materials submitted by the nominees. These materials allow each nominee to present the attributes and experiences he or she could bring to the position sought. This process involves significant self-assessment. In addition, each nominee writes a brief statement regarding an issue and its implications for critical care nursing.

Telephone interviews, using a standardized list of questions, gave each nominee the chance to elaborate on points that would demonstrate the essential ambassador and intellectual skills. Recording and transcribing these interviews allowed all members of the committee to review all nominees’ responses to interview questions in an objective way.

Names of individuals to provide letters of reference were requested from the nominees. In addition, letters of reference are solicited from individuals who have had the opportunity to work with a nominee on AACN activities. Again, this feedback is requested as it relates to the Leadership Framework. The reference information is used as a third component in the evaluation process.

At a weekend meeting in January, all the nominees were evaluated. At this point, the representatives of AACN and AACN Certification Corporation met together to evaluate the nominees with respect to the positions that were available. The two groups then met separately to further evaluate the pool of prospective candidates and select the most qualified candidates for each organization’s respective slate.

The committee also was asked to review the current nominating process and make recommendations that would make it more reflective of the mission and values of AACN and supportive of nominees. The committee members noted that the process was member-driven and supported the application of the ambassador and intellectual leadership skills sets. In addition, the process demonstrated the value of consensus building within the organization.

We were fortunate to experience the integrity of the organization and the nominating process. Most importantly, the breadth and depth of the nominees’ qualifications inspired the Nominating Committee.
We encourage all members to participate in the nominating process. Nominate yourself or a colleague for the 2003-04 ballot for the AACN Board of Directors, AACN Nominating Committee or AACN Certification Board of Directors. We are sure that you know colleagues who demonstrate the skill sets required and who would be honored to be nominated. Don’t be reluctant to nominate yourself.

Nominations may be submitted online at http://www.aacn.org.

Is There Value in the Experience?

What value did the members of the Nominating Committee feel the experience had for them? As they completed their work, committee members shared the accomplishments and learning that occur from serving on the committee. Following are some of the benefits they cited:

• Learning about leadership competencies, the process, and integrity of the process.
• An understanding of the depth and breadth of the skills of nominees and what things help members develop
• An understanding of what leadership looks like from multiple perspectives
• Interview tips
• An understanding of the value of consensus building
• Witnessing demonstration of the ideal process led by experienced past leaders.
• Learning that everyone comes to the table with accomplishments in leadership skills
• Learning the discipline of staying focused and not procrastinating
• A good understanding of leadership succession
• A reinforcement that AACN is truly member driven

Members of the AACN Nominating Committee for 2001-02 were Denise Thornby, RN, MS (chair), Sandra Cunningham, RN, MS, CCNS, CCRN, CS, Michael Day, RN, MSN, CCRN, and Mary Holtschneider, RN, BSN, MPA. Debbie Brinker, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN, Dave Hanson, RN, BSN, CCRN, EMT-P, and Lori D. Hendrickx, RN, EdD, CCRN. Brinker, Hanson and Hedrickx represent the AACN Board of Directors.

Representing the AACN Certification Corporation Board of Directors are immediate past Chair Patricia A. McGaffigan, RN, MS, current Director Beth Glassford, RN, MSHA, and appointed members Lillian V. Ananian, RN, MSN, and MaryLou Warren, RN, MSN, CCRN.


NTI Events to Benefit AACN Scholarship Endowment Fund


Shhh! Although this event may be “silent,” we certainly don’t want to keep it quiet. In fact, the Silent Auction created quite a buzz when it debuted at the 2001 National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition in Anaheim, Calif.

Again at the 2002 NTI, May 4 through 9 in Atlanta, Ga., the Silent Auction is one of two special attractions to raise funds for the AACN Scholarship Endowment Fund. And, you will want to enter a contest to win a new Santa Fe SUV, provided by Hyundai Motor America. Fees to enter the contest will benefit the AACN Scholarship Endowment Fund. NurseZone.com, is supporting the fund-raiser by providing materials for the contest.

Silent auction items will be on display in the NTI Resource and Registration area through Wednesday, May 8. Bidding is done by writing offers on a sheet that is maintained alongside each item.
Everyone attending the NTI, including participants, speakers, exhibitors, staff, family and friends, may bid, unless otherwise stated, for a particular auction item.

An auction catalog will describe the more than 200 gifts that have been donated by members, companies and individuals in a variety of categories, including art; educational products; personal electronics; books; entertainment; retail gift certificates; restaurant gift certificates; travel; and jewelry.

If you would like to donate a gift to the silent auction or have questions, contact Darval Bonelli at (800) 394-5995, ext. 531; e-mail, darval.bonelli@aacn.org.

AACN awards $150,000 in academic and continuing education scholarships each year. These include the BSN and Graduate Completion Educational Advancement Scholarships. AACN also supports scholarships awarded through the National Student Nurses Association to beginning nursing students.

At NTI 2002, 20 AACN Vision Partners and three Dale Medical Products scholars are benefitting from donations to the Scholarship Endowment Fund.

The Janus View

Editor’s note: All that we do is rooted in our past, and we have much to learn from the leaders who have gone before us, paved the way and laid the foundation. To strengthen this connection, current members of the AACN Board of Directors are interviewing some of our past leaders. For this month, board member Bertie Chuong, RN, MS, CCRN, interviewed Beth Eagleton, RN, MN, PhD, a past member of the AACN Board of Directors.

Since July 1999, Eagleton has been vice president of Patient Care Services and chief nursing officer at Saint John’s Medical Center, Joplin, Mo. Her experience in critical care began in a combined medical coronary care unit at Mount Carmel Medical Center, Pittsburg, Kan. She later served as divisional director of Continuum of Care at Columbia Healthcare Corporation Midwest Division, Wichita, Kan.; in multiple positions within the Wesley Medical Center, Wichita; and as corporate vice president and chief nursing executive of Baptist Health System in San Antonio, Texas;

Eagleton was elected to the AACN Board of Directors in 1992. Her volunteer activities range from chapter involvement to national appointments. In addition, Eagleton has been a contributing editor to Critical Care Nurse and has made more than 200 presentations throughout the world on clinical, leadership and performance improvement topics.

The Interview
Chuong: What are some of the lessons you learned as a member of the AACN Board of Directors?
Eagleton: The most important thing that I learned was that dialogue is needed to find out what is at the heart of an issue. Truly listening can make the difference in the solutions that are derived. The natural tendency is to think about your response as someone is talking to you about an issue, which may prevent you from really hearing what the other person is saying. During my tenure on the AACN Board, I learned to take in and base my questions on the information I heard. It really helped me to learn about what was being said. This has helped me to identify issues and solutions in all aspects of my professional and personal life.

Chuong: What were the greatest accomplishments of the AACN Board during your tenure?
Eagleton: The development of the Synergy Model stands out for me. It has been the framework for so much of the important work that continues even now. I also remember the time we devoted to addressing the critical care content considered essential in a nursing curriculum. The resulting “essentials document” continues to influence not only AACN’s work but also my current practice setting.

Chuong: What was the most exciting aspect of serving in your role as a member of the AACN Board of Directors?
Eagleton: All of the learning opportunities! It was so exciting to learn from others throughout the world what was going on in their practice settings. It also gave me a chance to think outside the everyday setting!
I also enjoyed being an ambassador for AACN, a commitment that I didn’t take lightly. I love mentoring new leaders and guiding those seeking to run for the board. New leaders must have a sincere commitment and take pride in their roles. Being an ambassador was important, and I believe I continue to be an ambassador for AACN.

Chuong: What was the most rewarding aspect of serving on the Board?
Eagleton: Truly, it was the experience of a lifetime. The friendships, both personal and professional, have been sustaining and incredibly rewarding. I feel that I can reach out and touch base with the many people I met while on the Board. I treasure my board experience as a gift.

Chuong: Describe your current role.
Eagleton: In my role as the VP for Patient Care Services and chief nursing officer, every day is different. As the chief executive, I try to spend time with patients every day. Patients have always been my focus, and they really energize me. Some days, I spend all day in strategic planning meetings or state visits, but others I assist in facilitating patient care at the unit level. Enjoying what I do is important to me, and I try to incorporate fun in my life at work.

Chuong: How do you balance your volunteer and leadership activities with the rest of your life?
Eagleton: I don’t. I just continuously try to help others. In my current role, I have less time, but I still make the time to help others! Once a week, I volunteer through the Catholic Health Initiatives to deliver Meals on Wheels to the needy in my town. I also sometimes take blood pressures or stop to see the infirm.

Chuong: In these unsettled times in healthcare, do you still think it is important for nurses to belong to professional organizations, such as AACN?
Eagleton: Absolutely! Through association participation, every nurse can share ideas and learn new things. AACN, in particular, has many resources, both human and materials. If you have a question, you can instantly get references by calling the national office or linking into the AACN Web site. You can literally have your finger on the pulse of an issue in a heartbeat. My affiliation with AACN has been invaluable. I can always learn what the trends are through these special resources.


Scene and Heard


AACN continues to seek visibility for our profession and the organization. Following is an update on recent outreach efforts:

Media Highlights
• Wendy J. Berke, RN, BSN, MHA, director of professional practice at AACN, and AACN Certification Corporation board member Margaret Ecklund, RN, MS, CCRN, CS, wrote an article titled “Keep Pace With Step-Down Care,” which appeared in and is featured on the cover of the February 2002 issue of Nursing Management. The article is the first in a six-part series the magazine is publishing on keeping pace with progressive care. The authors focused on how the number of progressive care units continues to increase as the patient acuity gap between critical care and medical-surgical care narrows.

• The “Career Focus” section of the February 2002 issue of Nursing2002 included AACN membership and nursing demographics information. This “spotlight on critical care nursing” focused on the definition of critical care nursing, the higher earnings of nurses certified through AACN Certification Corporation, based on the 2000 salary survey, and CCRN certification requirements. In addition, the article quoted AACN background information on the nursing shortage.

• The February 2002 issue of RN magazine included excerpts from the AACN News “President’s Note” column by Michael Williams, RN, MSN, CCRN, and information about NTI scholarships, national volunteer opportunities and the new Alumnus CCRN designation. In her “Editor’s Memo,” Marya Ostrowski cited Williams’ suggestion in a recent column to create a “done” list instead of a “to do” list to highlight accomplishments.

Our Voice at the Table
• AACN board members and national staff executives attended meetings and chapter symposiums all across the country. In February, President-elect Connie Barden, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN, spoke at the Tallahassee Memorial Heart & Vascular Institute Symposium. Her topics were “Nursing in La Vida Loca” and “Families: Who Do They Think They Are?” Also in February, Williams spoke at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation Cardiac Symposium on “Celebrating Nursing’s Greatness Today and Every Day” and “Challenges and Opportunities for Nursing in the 21st Century.”

• Ramon Lavandero, RN, MSN, MA, AACN’s director of development and strategic alliances, represented AACN at the semiannual meeting of the Medical Society Fundraising Network in February. AACN is the only nursing organization that participates in this network of fundraising and corporate relations directors from major medical associations.

If you or your chapter is planning to reach out to the media or other groups to promote critical care nursing, we’d like to know so that we can highlight your efforts in future columns. Please write to us at aacnnews@aacn.org.


May Is National Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month

Shine the spotlight on the critical difference you make every day during National Critical Care Awareness & Recognition Month in May 2002.

“Critical Care—Partners in Healing” is the theme of the annual celebration.

Please join AACN, in partnership with the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the American College of Chest Physicians, in celebrating the contributions of nurses, doctors and other vital members of the healthcare team.

The National Critical Care Awareness & Recognition Month logo has been incorporated into an array of products that can be used to enhance the visibility of critical care and to highlight the profession. These products can also be customized with your institution or chapter logo. Ranging from balloons and buttons to posters, pens, t-shirts and travel mugs, they are priced to fit almost any budget.

Critical care nurses continue to develop innovative ways to increase awareness of critical illness and recognize the healing that interdisciplinary partnerships bring to their communities. Unit displays and daylong, hospital-wide health fairs are only a few of the celebration activities. Appreciation gifts bearing the year’s logo are an affordable way to recognize each member of the healthcare team.

If you are looking for ways to celebrate with your staff, here are a few suggestions:
• Give a small gift to each member of your team—maybe a cup with a “Partners in Healing” logo. Fill the cup with treats of your choice.
• Generate extra excitement by raffling off a few larger prizes, such as AACN memberships, pocket radios or tote bags.
• Add “Partners in Healing” posters, balloons and pins to your hospital’s Nurse Week or Hospital Week celebration.

To request the 2002 National Critical Care Awareness & Recognition Month product guide, call (800) 822-1923. Request Item #0001.


On the Agenda

Following is a report by AACN board member Debbie Brinker, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN, on discussions and actions that took place during a February 2002 board conference call.

Agenda Item: End of Life/Palliative Care
The board received information about two new, small project grants related to end-of-life and palliative care. End-of-life issues are an important area in which AACN has a leadership role, and the board was enthusiastic about these grants as an exciting first step and starting point for relevant research.

Agenda Item: AACN Certification Corporation Board of Directors
The board approved the following slate of candidates to serve on the AACN Certification Corporation Board of Directors: chair-elect (one-year term)—Suzanne Prevost, RN, PhD, CNAA, and directors (two-year terms)—Roberta Kaplow, RN, PhD, CCNS, CCRN, and Judy Verger, RN, MSN, CCRN. Their terms begin July 1, 2002.

The selection of candidates for the AACN Certification Corporation board is part of AACN’s annual Call for Nominations. However, once the nominations are received, Nominating Committee members representing AACN Certification Corporation follow a separate path in evaluating and interviewing these nominees. The nominating process differs from that for the AACN Board of Directors and the AACN Nominating Committee, because AACN members at large do not vote on candidates for the AACN Certification Board of Directors. Because AACN is the sole member of AACN Certification Corporation, the AACN board is required to formally approve corporation candidates.

Note: The AACN Certification Corporation board presents an excellent opportunity for people who are passionate about certification to apply to serve at the national level. The annual Call for Nominations for positions available on the AACN Certification Corporation Board of Directors appears on page 11 of this issue of AACN News. The Call for Nominations for the AACN Board of Directors and the AACN Nominating Committee appears on page 1. The nomination form has also been inserted into the center of this issue of AACN News and is available online at http://www.aacn.org > Call for Nominations.

Agenda Item: Strategic Plan and Operating Plan
The board made a preliminary review of the association’s Strategic Plan and Operating Plan for 2002-03 in preparation for finalizing these important documents at the April 2002 board meeting. The board was asked to reaffirm whether changes made based on discussions in November 2001 continue to be relevant.

The Strategic Plan, which is driven by AACN’s mission, provides the overall vision and direction for the association into the future. It is the board’s guide in discussing and approving association initiatives to meet the needs of members. Information comes from a variety of sources, including environmental scanning and data about trends in healthcare.

In addition, AACN President-elect Connie Barden, RN, MSN, CCNS, CCRN, shared discussions that took place at the long-range strategic planning meeting in January. Although the association’s long-range strategic plan is reviewed and updated each year, it is monitored on an ongoing basis to ensure that it reflects changes in the healthcare environment and that the association is positioned to be proactive on issues as they arise. Barden noted that considerable attention was given to how the data and environ mental scans can assist AACN in meeting the needs of members now and in the future.. Discussion at the planning meeting also centered on AACN’s leading role as the voice for critical care nursing.

Agenda Item: Financial Report
The board approved the quarterly financial report, which showed that AACN expenses were below budget for all categories and that revenue from the sale of educational resources was up. Part of the board’s accountability to continually monitor financial resources, this report helped to prepare the board for the 2002-03 budget, which is scheduled for approval in conjunction with the finalized Strategic and Operating plans at the April meeting.

Critical Links: Who Has Recruited New Members?

AACN welcomed 2,158 new members from May 1, 2001, to March 1, 2002, as a result of the recently ended Critical Links member-get-a-member campaign.
Contributing to this total have been 544 individuals and 76 chapters.

As the campaign headed down the final stretch, member recruiter Darlene Legge of Flower Mound, Texas, had personally brought 31 new members into the AACN family by the end of February. The final results of the campaign will be reported in the May 2002 issue of AACN News.

The top individual recruiter in the campaign will receive a $500 American Express gift certificate and be eligible for the first-, second- and third-place prizes.

In addition, to a $250 gift certificate toward the purchase of AACN resources, the chapters reporting the largest increase in their membership will receive recognition at NTI 2002, May 4 through 9 in Atlanta, Ga.

Following are the cumulative totals for members recruiting new members during February, as well as those who have recruited five or more new members since the campaign began. Chapter totals are also listed.
 

Recruiter #Recruited
Ismael J. Abregonde, RN, BSN 5
Lillian Aguirre, RN, BSN, CCRN 6
Maria Antonio, RN 1
Judith A. Ascenzi, RN, MSN 6
Marie Aue 1
Perrilynn A. Baldelli, RN, MSN, CCRN 8
Vevyette Batson, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Elizabeth Bayley, RN, PhD 1
Tara Beebout, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Michael Beshel, RN, BSN, CCRN, CEN 16
Michael C. Blanchard, RN 6
Lisa M. Boldrighini 5
Michelle Bond-Spandiary, RN, ADN, CCRN 1
Marylee Bressie, RN, MSN, CCRN 1
Susan Burhans, RNC, BSN 1
Kathleen M. Burton, RN, BSN 5
Helen M. Camp, RN, CCRN 11
Yolanda Carilimdiliman, RN, BSN,BS 2
Beverly Ann Carlson, RN, PhD, CCRN 14
Ann Marie Carpenter, RN, MSN,CCRN, CNS 17
Bonnie J. Cerrato, RN, ADN, AA 7
Kristine Chaisson, RN, BSN, CCRN 5
Michael Chalot, RN, ADN, CCRN 7
Pamela Chapman, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Sasipa Charnchaichujit, RN 8
Ellen Clifton, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Katherine Colbert, RN, ADN, CCRN 6
Sheree Collins, RN, ADN 1
Kathleen J. Corban, RN, BSN, CCRN 5
Barbara Cox, RN, ADN, AA 1
Cynthia G. Cox, RN, BSN, CCRN, FNP 7
Rosalyn Cranston, RN 1
Sue Ann Crisp, RN, BSN, BS 8
Elsie Croom, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Eva M. Crosby, RN 9
Beatrice Davis, RN, BS, CCRN 1
Therisa Davis, RN 1
Laurie Dean, RN ,CCRN 1
Cheryl Devillier, RN, ADN 1
Melissa L. Drain, RN, CCRN 29
Lisa Duncan, RN, BSN 1
Anne C. Dunn, RN, BSN, CCRN 7
Marie Eidam, RN, MS 1
Peggy Lynn Ennis, RN 26
Judith Fabrizio, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
B. Fankhanel, RN, BSN 1
Susan Feeney, RN, ADN, CCRN 1
Carolyn A. Fernandez, RN, MSN, 6
CCRN, CS, ACNP
Myrna F. Fontillas-Boehm, RN, BS,BSN, CCRN 6
Angela Foran , RN, ADN, CCRN 1
Virginia Forshee, RN 1
Carol D. Fountain, RN, CCRN 5
Wendy Franklin, RN, BSN, CCRN 2
Carla J. Freeman, RN, BSN, CCRN 10
Patricia Fuller, RN, BS, BSN, MEd 1
Tammy Gillham, RN, CCRN 1
Deborah Glenn, RN, MSN 1
Mary Kathryn Graham, RN, BSN 3
Pauline Graham, RN, BSN 1
Lita T. Gorman, RN, BSN, CCRN, CEN 6
Mary Kathryn Graham, RN, BSN 8
Karen Gravley 1
Cynthia Green, RN, BSN, BA, CCRN 1
Lisa C. Gregory, RN, BSN 5
Mark Griffith 1
Jackie Grigg, RN, ADN, CCRN 8
Kaye Grubaugh, RN, MSN 1
Carol Guyette, RN, BSN, CCRN 28
Kathy Hagains 4
Liana Hain, RN, MS, CCRN 2
Charlene A. Haley-Moyer, RN, 5
MS, CCRN
Wendi Haller, RN, BSN 1
Diane Hamilton, RN, MN, CCRN 1
Linda Hampton, RN, MS, CCRN 1
Jane Hartman, RN, MS, CCRN 1
Margaret Harvey, RN, ACNP ,CS 1
Lee Ann Haygood, RN, BSN, CCRN, 1
CNA
Janet Henderson, RN, ADN 3
Lori H endrickx, RN, EdD, CCRN 1
Michelle L. Henrickson, RN, BSN 5
Amy Herrig, RN, ADN 1
Mary Hillberg, RN, BSN, CCRN, CEN 1
Kirsten Hillman, RN, ADN, AA 1
Carol Hinkle, RN, MSN, BA, CCRN 1
Mary E. Holtschneider, RN, BSN, 6
MPA
Zondra Hull, RN 6
Jana Woller Hough, RN, BSN 10
Recruiter                                                                 #Recruited
Christiana Jackai, RN, BSN 1
Patricia Dianne Jennings, RN, ADN, 5
CCRN
Debbie Karen Jessell, RN, CCRN 7
Linnea Johnson, RN, MSN, BA 1
Lauretta M. Joseph, RN, MSN, 13
CCRN, NP
Louisa K. Kamatuka, RN, MSN, 6
CCRN, CS
Kathleen Kane, RN, ADN, BS, CCRN 1
Beryl E. Keegan, RN, BSN, CCRN 9
Doris Kennedy, RN, BSN, BA, CCRN 1
Lori E. Kennedy, RN, BSN, CCRN 7
Nancy D. King, RN, MSN, 22
CCRN, NP
Katherine Kleinow, RN, BSN 1
Kelly A. Knickerbocker, RN 7
Debra Knight, RN, BSN 1
Colleen Kowalchuk, RN, CCRN 7
Joanne M. Kuszaj, RN, MSN, CCRN 5
Hilarie Larson, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Darlene M. Legge, RN, BSN, CCRN 31
Laura Lipp, RN 1
Karen London, RN, ADN 1
Eugenia Macalald 1
Michele L. Manning, RN, MSN, 8
CCRN, CS
Polly Ann Marinelli, RN, ADN 8
Stephanie Mason, RN 1
Martie C. Mattson, RN, CNS, 8
MSN, CCRN
Ashlee T. Mattutini, RN 9
Elaine Mayo 1
Michael McEvoy, RN, ADN, PhD, 1
CCRN
Yvonne McKenna, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
James Mears, RN 6
Marla Meaux, RN, CCRN 3
Justine Medina, RN, MS 2
Ruth G. Melvin, RN, BSN, CCRN 8
Arlene N. Messina, RN, ADN, CCRN 5
Maranda Meyer, RN, ADN 3
Katherine H. Miller, RN, ADN 10
Nicolette Mininni, RN, MEd, CCRN 1
Gina Montagnino, RN, MSN, CCRN, 1
CPNP
Bonita Moore, RN, BS, BSN, CCRN 1
Bettina Moxley, RN, BS, BSN, CCRN 1
Annette M. Mtangi, RN, ADN, CCRN 21
Paulita D. Narag, RN, ADN, CCRN 8
Amanda L. Newman 5
Donna M. O’Neill, RN, ADN, CCRN 5
Sheila Palmer, RN, BSN 1
Judy Parker, RN, ADN, CCRN 1
Kathleen Peavy, RN, MS, CCRN 2
Amy Pelleg, RN, MSN, CCRN 1
Norma Peralta, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Hurd Alton Pittman, RN, MSN, CCRN 9
Colleen O. Planchon, RN, BSN, 10
BS, CCRN
Anne Pondevida, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Kathleen Quattrocchi, RN, BSN 8
Michele Quinlan, RN, BSN 26
Juan Quintero, RN, MSN, CCRN 2
Angela Raquepo, RN, BSN 1
Kathleen M. Richuso, RN, MSN 13
Donna Robinson, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Margaret Rollins, RN, MSN, CCRN 1
Dorothy Rose Phelps, RN, BS, CCRN 9
Jeff Reece, RN, BSN 7
Carol Reitz-Barlow, RN, CCRN 5
Margaret Riley, RN, BSN, CCRN 23
Christiana Jackai, RN, BSN 1
Patricia Dianne Jennings, RN, ADN, 5
CCRN
Debbie Karen Jessell, RN, CCRN 7
Linnea Johnson, RN, MSN, BA 1
Lauretta M. Joseph, RN, MSN, 13
CCRN, NP
Louisa K. Kamatuka, RN, MSN, 6
CCRN, CS
Kathleen Kane, RN, ADN, BS, CCRN 1
Beryl E. Keegan, RN, BSN, CCRN 9
Doris Kennedy, RN, BSN, BA, CCRN 1
Lori E. Kennedy, RN, BSN, CCRN 7
Nancy D. King, RN, MSN, 22
CCRN, NP
Katherine Kleinow, RN, BSN 1
Kelly A. Knickerbocker, RN 7
Debra Knight, RN, BSN 1
Colleen Kowalchuk, RN, CCRN 7
Joanne M. Kuszaj, RN, MSN, CCRN 5
Hilarie Larson, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Darlene M. Legge, RN, BSN, CCRN 31
Laura Lipp, RN 1
Karen London, RN, ADN 1
Eugenia Macalald 1
Michele L. Manning, RN, MSN, 8
CCRN, CS
Polly Ann Marinelli, RN, ADN 8
Stephanie Mason, RN 1
Martie C. Mattson, RN, CNS, 8
MSN, CCRN
Ashlee T. Mattutini, RN 9
Elaine Mayo 1
Michael McEvoy, RN, ADN, PhD, 1
CCRN
Yvonne McKenna, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
James Mears, RN 6
Marla Meaux, RN, CCRN 3
Justine Medina, RN, MS 2
Ruth G. Melvin, RN, BSN, CCRN 8
Arlene N. Messina, RN, ADN, CCRN 5
Maranda Meyer, RN, ADN 3
Katherine H. Miller, RN, ADN 10
Nicolette Mininni, RN, MEd, CCRN 1
Gina Montagnino, RN, MSN, CCRN, 1
CPNP
Bonita Moore, RN, BS, BSN, CCRN 1
Bettina Moxley, RN, BS, BSN, CCRN 1
Annette M. Mtangi, RN, ADN, CCRN 21
Paulita D. Narag, RN, ADN, CCRN 8
Amanda L. Newman 5
Donna M. O’Neill, RN, ADN, CCRN 5
Sheila Palmer, RN, BSN 1
Judy Parker, RN, ADN, CCRN 1
Kathleen Peavy, RN, MS, CCRN 2
Amy Pelleg, RN, MSN, CCRN 1
Norma Peralta, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Hurd Alton Pittman, RN, MSN, CCRN 9
Colleen O. Planchon, RN, BSN, 10
BS, CCRN
Anne Pondevida, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Kathleen Quattrocchi, RN, BSN 8
Michele Quinlan, RN, BSN 26
Juan Quintero, RN, MSN, CCRN 2
Angela Raquepo, RN, BSN 1
Kathleen M. Richuso, RN, MSN 13
Donna Robinson, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Margaret Rollins, RN, MSN, CCRN 1
Dorothy Rose Phelps, RN, BS, CCRN 9
Jeff Reece, RN, BSN 7
Carol Reitz-Barlow, RN, CCRN 5
Margaret Riley, RN, BSN, CCRN 23
Recruiter #Rec ruited
Barbara Sampson, RN, BSN 1
Barbara Ann Schnakenberg, RN 5
Lynn Smith Schnautz, RN, MSN, 16
CCRN
Mary Schneiderhahn, RN, MSN, CS 1
Marlene Schoettle, RN, MSN, CCRN 1
Lynn Scott, RN, BSN, BA, CCRN 1
Robin K. Selbach, RN, BSN, MBA, 5
CCRN
Lindsey Shank, RN, BSN, CCRN 11
Lynn Simko, RN, PhD, CCRN 1
Anita M. Siscoe-Hapshie, RN, CCRN 6
Jacqueline Smith, RN 1
Sandra Smith, PhD, APRN 1
Mary Lou Sole, RN, PhD, CCRN, FAAN 2
Michelle Sommers, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Janet Staab, RN, MSN, CCRN 1
Kathleen Stacey 1
Margaret Stackpoole 1
Pat Stanton, RN, MS, CCRN 1
Cynthia L. Steinbach, RN, BSN, 5
CCRN
Elaine Stevens, RN, BS, MSN, CCRN, 1
CCNS
Janice L. Stevens, RN, BSN, CCRN, 5
CNRN
Theresa Stevens, RN, MS, CCRN, 2
CCNS
Agnes Stewart, RN 1
Mary C. Stewart, RN, BSN, MBA 13
Sharon Stewart, RN, MSN, CCRN 1
Marjorie A. Stock, RN, ADN, CCRN 5
Mildred Swan, RN, CCRN 1
Susan Swanson, RN, MS, CCRN, CCNS 1
Yvonne Thelwell, RN 19
Linda C. Thomas, RN, MSN, CCRN 6
Mary Fran Tracy, RN, PhD, CCRN 1
Rita C. Uberti, RN, BS, CCRN 11
Tracy Unertl, RN, BSN 1
Valerie Vogeler, RN, BSN, CCRN 2
Diane Walsh, RN 1
Melissa Warthen, RN, MSN 1
Holly L. Weber-Johnson, RN, BSN 11
Barbara G. Wiles, RN, BSN, CCRN 9
Felecia Williams, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Michael L. Williams, RN, MSN, 6
CCRN
Melanie K. Williamson, RN, CCRN 6
Jana Woller Hough, RN, BSN 1
Kathy L. Woods, RN 5
Jean Yavorski, RN, BSN, CCRN 1
Pam Zinnecker, RN, CCRN 6
Marcy Zoller, RN, BSN 1

Chapters
Albemarle Area Chapter 6
Anchorage Chapter 5
Atlanta Area Chapter 68
Brevard Chapter 8
Brooklyn Chapter 24
Broward County Chapter 11
Carolina Dogwood Chapter 7
Central Pennsylvania Chapter 1
Coastal Chapter 1
Foot of the Blue Ridge Chapter 15
Greater Akron Area Chapter 2
Greater Austin Area Chapter 12
Greater Birmingham Chapter 1
Greater Chicago Area Chapter 1
Greater East Texas Chapter 16
Greater Evansville Chapter 28
Greater Flint Area Chapter 8
Greater Kansas City Chapter 1
Greater Louisville Chapter 21
Greater Miami Area Chapter 21
Greater Milwaukee Area Chapter 22
Greater New Orleans Chapter 1
Greater Phoenix Area Chapter 9
Greater Raleigh Area Chapter 15
Greater St. Louis Chapter 2
Greater Tulsa Area Chapter 21
Head of the Lakes Chapter 5
Heart of Acadiana Chapter 13
Heart of the Piedmont Chapter 36
Jersey Shoreline Chapter 1
Metropolitan Orlando Chapter 6
Minot Roughrider Chapter 11
Mississippi Gulf Coast 1
Magnolia Chapter
Mobile Bay Area Chapter 7
Montana Big Sky Chapter 6
North Central Florida Chapter 39
North Central Wisconsin Chapter 5
Northeast Indiana Chapter 7
Northwest Georgia Chapter 19
Ocean State Chapter 1
Pacific Crest Regional Chapter 34
Palmetto Chapter 8
Peninsula Chapter 12
Piedmont Carolinas Chapter 1
Siouxland Chapter 5
Smoky Mountain Chapter 2
South Bay Chapter 1
South Carolina Mid State Chapter 10
Southeastern Pennsylvania Chapter 18
Southern Maine Chapter 2
Spokane Chapter 5
Vermont Green Mountain Chapter 28
Washtenaw County Chapter 1

February Rewards
Congratulations to the reward recipients in our monthly membership campaign drawings for February. Each month, one chapter receives a complimentary registration to NTI 2002, and one individual receives a $100 American Express gift certificate. The recipients are randomly selected from those who recruited at least one new member during the month.

The recipients in February were:

• Chapter—Atlanta Area Chapter
• Tracy Unertl, RN, BSN

To obtain Critical Links recruitment forms, call (800) 899-2226. Request Item #1316. Or, visit the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org > Membership.

Public Policy Update

Issue: RN Survey
Update: Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson has released the final report of the 2000 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses. The report, which is the most comprehensive statistical resource on the nation’s RNs, shows that the average RN age continues to increase and that the rate of nurses entering the profession, particularly young nurses, continues to decline. The survey also found that the rate of nurses entering the workforce between 1996 and 2000 was down from 14% the previous four years to 4.1% . Other findings were:

• The number of active, licensed RNs had increased 137,666 to approximately 2.697 million since 1996.
• 81.7% of active, licensed RNs are employed in nursing.
• 12.3% reported being of one or more racial or ethnic minority background.
• 5.9% are men, up from 5.4%.
• The number of nurses working in hospitals increased from 1,270,870 to 1,300,323.

Issue: Bioterrorism Preparedness
Update: Teleconferences are an effective way to provide standardized bioterrorism preparedness training to large, geographically diverse groups of doctors, nurses and other clinicians, according to a report by the Agency for Health Research Quality’s Evidence-Based Practice Center at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. In fact, the report states that satellite teleconferences may be as effective as classroom teaching.

The report, titled “Training of Clinicians for Public Health Events Relevant to Bioterrorism Preparedness,” reviewed 60 studies on the most- and least-effective strategies for training clinicians to be prepared for bioterrorism. AHRQ’s $5 million bioterrorism, research portfolio includes projects to examine the clinical training and ability of front-line medical staff, including primary care providers, emergency departments and hospitals, to detect and respond to a bioterrorist threat.

Issue: Mandatory Overtime
Status: A bill to ban mandatory overtime for nurses and other healthcare workers is working its way through the Wisconsin Legislature. Although approved by the state Senate on a 19-14 vote, the state Assembly is expected to send the measure to the Joint Finance Committee and an uncertain future. A key assembly leader already has argued that the contract issue would be best left to labor and management, not lawmakers.

The bill, which was introduced by a registered nurse, Sen. Judy Robson, would prohibit a hospital, nursing home, clinic or other healthcare facility from requiring a nurse or other employee who is caring for patients or residents to work overtime. Healthcare employers could not force employees directly involved in the care of individuals and paid an hourly wage to work beyond their regular shift and exceed 40 hours a week. Healthcare workers could still work overtime if they wanted, and the ban would not apply in situations where a hospital had no alternative, for example, when faced with an unforeseeable emergency. The bill would protect workers who refuse overtime from discharge, demotion or other disciplinary actions. An employer who retaliates could be fined up to $1,000 for the first offense and up to $5,000 for a second violation in a year. An identical bill, introduced by Rep. DuWayne Johnsrud, was awaiting action in the Senate Finance Committee.

During Senate debate, Robson said nurses forced to work back-to-back shifts are bound to make mistakes that endanger patients. However, Sen. Mike Ellis said Robson’s bill would exacerbate staffing problems created by the nursing shortage and leave critical care gaps that are equally life threatening.

AACN Position: AACN believes that mandatory overtime is not an acceptable way to meet staffing needs. Mandatory overtime is neither an accepted practice in the nursing community nor a “standard” of the industry, and nurses should not be forced into working beyond their capacity to provide optimal care.

Issue: Needlestick Safety
Status: Venetec International is the first company to announce that it will include a needlestick-safety advisory to clinicians as part of its safety securement device’s standard packaging. The advisory, known as the “Notification to Clinicians on Sharps Injury Prevention,” was created by the National Alliance for the Primary Prevention of Sharps Injuries.

NAPPSI has petitioned the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and other leading medical and safety organizations to broadly publish the clinician advisory as a way of alerting doctors and nurses to technologies and practices that reduce or eliminate the use of sharp implements.

AACN Position: As a member of NAPPSI, a national nonprofit organization composed of clinician organizations representing thousands of healthcare workers, hundreds of individual clinicians and more than 20 manufacturers, AACN has endorsed the advisory.

Issue: Geriatric Training
Background: The need for more geriatric training for healthcare professionals was the focus of a February hearing by the Senate Special Committee On Aging. Highlighting the problem was a report titled “Medical Never-Never Land: 10 Reasons Why America is Not Ready for the Coming Age Boom,” which was released by the Alliance for Aging Research.

The report notes that, though Americans who are older than 65 represent more than half of physician visits annually, only a small percentage of healthcare professionals actually have specific training to appropriately care for this population.

For more information on the report, contact Amber McCracken at the Alliance for Aging Research, (202) 293-2856.

AACN Position: AACN promotes the highest level of geriatric competence in all nurses to ensure that people age with optimal function, comfort and dignity and encourages the development of best practices in nursing care of older adults.

Issue: Nursing Shortage
Update: The nursing shortage is attracting attention at both the state and federal levels, with various actions to address the problem being taken across the nation.

To help address the nation’s growing need for nurses, President Bush’s fiscal year 2003 budget proposes a total of $15 million, nearly 50% more than last year, to expand the Nursing Education Loan Repayment Program. The increase would support 800 new nursing education loan repayment agreements. The program repays a substantial portion of the education loans of nurses who agree to work for two years in designated public or nonprofit health facilities. Funding preference is given to nurses who have the greatest financial need and who agree to serve in health facilities located in geographic areas with a shortage of nurses.

Following is a wrap-up of activity related to the nursing shortage:
• The Bush administration recently unveiled “Kids into Health Careers,” an educational campaign to attract more children to careers in nursing and the healthcare profession. A related tool kit has information on a range of health careers.
• HHS Secretary Thompson announced a new series of grants and contracts totaling more than $27.4 million to increase the number of qualified nurses and the quality of nursing services across the country. The awards are designed to help ease the emerging shortage of qualified nurses available to provide essential healthcare services in many communities nationwide.
• A federal study ordered by Congress found that the majority of the nation’s nursing homes, about 90%, are staffed too thinly to properly provide basic services. The study concludes that achieving proper staffing would cost nursing homes $7.6 billion a year. A final version is being prepared by the Department of Health and Human Services.
Although the report found that the link between nursing home staffing levels and poor care is compelling, administration officials were unwilling to say whether they will mandate minimum staffing levels for nursing homes, as critics have long demanded. Florida and California have already passed legislation that sets minimum staffing levels for nursing homes, and several other states are considering following suit.
Pointing to plans to force all nursing homes to make public their staff-to-patient ratio, the administration said public demand for more staffing will pressure nursing homes to do a better job.
• Johnson & Johnson has announced the launch of a multiyear campaign that includes national advertising to attract more people to nursing as a career in hospitals and extended care facilities. The campaign, which is projected to exceed $20 million in costs over the next two years, was developed with several national nursing organizations. Called “The Campaign for Nursing’s Future,” the initiative includes recruitment brochures, posters and videos for 20,000 high schools and 1,500 nursing schools and nursing organizations; scholarship funds for students and nursing faculty; a multicity scholarship fund-raising campaign with hospitals, nursing organizations and hospital associations; and a Web site (www.discovernursing.net) about the benefits of a nursing career and featuring searchable links to hundreds of nursing scholarships and more than 1,000 accredited nursing education programs. The campaign, which celebrates nurses and their contributions, initially aired during the winter Olympics.
• A recent survey by the American Hospital Association concluded that the hospital workforce shortage is worsening. The survey found that the average vacancy rate for registered nurses is 13%, though one in seven hospitals nationwide reported RN vacancy rates at higher than 20%. Nurse vacancy rates have increased at 60% of all hospitals since 1999. Vacancy rates for pharmacists and radiology technicians were also above 10%, according to the survey.
Hospitals are trying to respond, the AHA survey showed, with 51% saying they offer sign-on bonuses, and 56% saying they rely on contract nurses. Better pay and more flexible hours have improved the situation to some degree. Hospitals reported that the number of pharmacists employed has risen 11% since 1999, while the number of imaging technicians and RNs are both up 8%. However, the survey indicated that the shortage will likely get worse before it gets better, with the average nurse vacancy rate projected to reach 15% by 2003.
Retaining existing staff is also becoming more difficult. The survey found 49% of hospitals reporting that nursing staff turnover has worsened since 1999. Overall, 82% of the hospitals surveyed said nurse recruiting is harder than two years ago.
• A Healthcare Association of Southern California initiative has increased the number of nursing students in a six-country region by 500 in the past year by working with hospitals and nursing schools to coordinate their needs. A consultant hired by the association determines what the schools in each community need to increase enrollment and retention in programs preparing registered nurses, such as funding to add faculty or more clinical slots for students at hospitals, explained HASC spokesperson James Lott. The consultant, a nurse executive and educator then visit hospitals in the area to see what they can do to help.
• Arizona Gov. Jane Dee Hull has appointed a Nursing Shortage Task Force to address her state’s need for nurses. She said she is charging the task force to focus on solutions, not on restating the problem. The group, which is comprised of representatives from hospitals, nursing, long-term care, education and public health, is expected to submit its final recommendations by Dec. 21, 2003.
• The Florida International University School of Nursing has launched a yearlong campaign, which includes partnerships with area hospitals, to address specific nurse shortage challenges in South Florida. For example, Mount Sinai Medical Center has provided $360,000 in funding and other support to the school’s new nurse anesthetist program. Baptist Health Systems has committed $360,000 over six years toward four-year scholarships to help in recruiting high school students to the school. Tenet South Florida Health Systems has committed $230,000 over three years for an additional medical-surgical nursing faculty member at the school. Miami Children’s Hospital has made an in-kind contribution valued at $230,000 for a pediatric nursing faculty member. Four other hospitals are contributing $600,000 to a new program to prepare foreign-trained physicians to become nurses. The school also is partnering with a health professions high school in Miami on a program to recruit minority students to nursing.
• The South Dakota House Appropriations Committee has approved $1.1 million in funding to expand nursing education programs at South Dakota State University and the
University of South Dakota.
• It appears that the nursing shortage and its attendant publicity are affecting wages and working conditions nationwide. In Boston, Tufts-New England Medical Center has agreed to raise nurses’ pay by 18 to 23% over 21 months, a deal the nurses union called the state’s biggest raise in nearly two decades. In California, Gov. Gray Davis has announced the nation’s first state-mandated, nurse-to-patient ratios, tentatively set at 1 to 6 on regular hospital floors and 1 to 1 for trauma and intensive care patients. A similar ratio bill is being debated in the Massachusetts Legislature. Proponents cite studies showing that care improves when there are more nurses per patient. Critics say that those studies are inconclusive and that state-mandated ratios rob hospitals of the flexibility they need. With 10% of the nation’s nursing jobs vacant and one in seven hospitals reporting a nursing vacancy rate of 20%, 41% of hospitals are paying signing bonuses as high as $10,000.
• In September, nursing-school enrollment rose 3.7%, ending a six-year slide, according to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. However, there are still roughly 21,000 fewer students than in 1995, not enough to meet the demand for new nurses or to stave off a projected shortage of 500,000 registered nurses by 2020.
Meanwhile, some healthcare executives fear that too much power for nurses, particularly nurses’ unions, could weaken hospitals financially, thereby harming patients. Nevertheless, there is a broad consensus among healthcare executives and politicians that nurses, who represent the largest block of employees in the troubled healthcare system, need a boost. Hospitals and unions alike are thrilled that Congress and state legislatures are setting aside money for nurse training.

Issue: Whistleblower Protection
Background: An agreement has been reached between the New York State Legislature and Gov. George Pataki regarding a bill to extend protection from retaliation against healthcare workers who report improprieties in their industry. Although the bill would apply to all healthcare industry employees, it was driven by the complaints of nurses who said they continue to face punishment or dismissal for bringing to light wrongdoing. The current law says workers who come forward to report actual harm against patients in the healthcare system cannot be fired, demoted or otherwise punished by their employers. Under the agreement, the same protections will be extended to whistleblowers who report situations where patients are potentially at risk of harm.

The Democrat-controlled state Assembly approved the bill unanimously. An identical measure will be taken up in the Republican-controlled state Senate. Assembly sponsor Catherine Nolan and Senate sponsor Nicholas Spano said the bill was negotiated with Pataki’s office.

Be an AACN-CCRN Ambassador


Join the AACN-CCRN ambassadors, a group of AACN members, CCRNs and CCNSs who are dedicated to promoting the many benefits of AACN and certified practice.

These volunteers are a valuable link in furthering AACN’s mission and vision by connecting with other critical care nurses in their communities and promoting the value of nursing in a range of settings.

If you are interested in becoming an AACN-CCRN ambassador, you may sign up online at http://www.aacn.org > Membership > Volunteer Opportunities.

Coming in the May Issue of the American Journal of Critical Care

• Resource Utilization Related to Atrial Fibrillation After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

• Effect of a Critical Pathway on Outcomes of Patients Following Carotid Endarterectomy

• The Vortex: Families' Experiences With an ICU Death

• Women's Perceptions of Personal Cardiovascular Risk and Their Risk-Reducing Behaviors

Subscriptions to Critical Care Nurse and the American Journal of Critical Care are included in AACN membership dues.


Celebrate Volunteerism! National Volunteer Recognition Week Is April 21-27, 2002

AACN thanks the many volunteers whose dedication and commitment to their professional association are making a difference for patients and their families. We appreciate the work you do and are truly indebted to you for your services.

Looking Ahead

May 2002

May 1-31 National Critical Care Awareness and Recognition Month.

May 1 Deadline to apply for AACN-sponsored American Nurses Foundation Research Grant. To obtain an application, contact the American Nurses Foundation/NRG00, 600 Maryland
Avenue, SW, Suite 100W, Washington, DC 20024-2571; phone, (202) 651-7298; e-mail,
anf@ana.org; Web site, http://www.nursingworld.org/anf.

May 4-9 National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition, Atlanta, Ga. To register, call (800) 899-2226 or visit the AACN Web site at http://www.aacn.org> NTI.

May 6 National Nurses Day.

May 7 AACN Annual Meeting and Forum, Tuesday, noon to 1:15 p.m., Georgia World Congress Center, Atlanta, Ga.


June 2002
June 14 Deadline to submit nominations for positions on the AACN Board of Directors, AACN Certification Corporation Board of Directors and AACN Nominating Committee for
2002-03. The nomination form is included in this issue of AACN News. Forms can also be obtained by calling (800) 394-5995, ext. 307, or via the AACN Web site
at
http://www.aacn.org > Call for Nominations.

June 21 Deadline to apply for the AACN Wyeth Nursing Fellows Program. To obtain an application, call (800) 899-2226 and request Item #2005 or AACN Fax on Demand at
(800) 222-6329 and request Document #2005. Applications are also available online at
http://www.aacn.org > Clinical Practice > Research > Awards.


June 30 3-Person Discount program for CCRN exam ends. The discount flyer is available by calling (800) 899-2226 or e-mailing certcorp@aacn.org. The flyer can also be downloaded
from the AACN Certification Corporation Web site at
http://www.certcorp.org > CCRN.


July 2002
July 15 Deadline to apply for the AACN Circle of Excellence Award program for 2002. To obtain an awards guide, call (800) 899-2226 and request Item #1011, or visit the AACN Web
site at
http://www.aacn.org > Membership >Awards, Grants, Scholarships.
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