Nominating Committee: Kiersten Henry

 Kiersten N. Henry

Kiersten N. Henry, ACNP-BC, CCNS, CCRN-CMC
Chief Advanced Practice Provider

MedStar Montgomery Medical Center
Olney, MD

Experience and Activities


Chapter Membership

  • Greater Washington Area Chapter, 2003-present

AACN Commitment and Involvement, 2012 - present

Includes ways in which the candidate integrated the mission and work of AACN into her current role and practice. Local and national volunteer activities are listed, if applicable.

  • CMC Practice Analysis Task Force, February 2015-present
  • “Arterial Blood Gas Interpretation,” “Common Pulmonary Problems in Critical Care” and “Acute PE,” Greater Washington Area Chapter Critical Care Consortium Course (offered three-four times annually for nurses at several area hospitals who are new to critical care), May 2003-present
  • Henry K. Automated external defibrillation. In Wiegand DL, Day MW, Makic BF, Fitzpatrick E, eds. AACN Procedure Manual for Critical Care. 7th ed. Elsevier. In press.
  • Henry K. External wearable cardioverter defibrillator. In Wiegand DL, Day MW, Makic BF, Fitzpatrick E, eds. AACN Procedure Manual for Critical Care. 7th ed. Elsevier. In press.
  • ACCNS-AG Virtual Exam Development Committee, June 2014
  • CMC Virtual Exam Development Committee, March 2014
  • CMC Virtual Item Writing Committee, February 2013
  • National Teaching Institute
    • “Cardiac Medications and the Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System,” May 2015
    • “90 is the New 60: Geriatric Cardiovascular Case Studies,” May 2014
    • “Cardiac Medications and the Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System” and “90 is the New 60: Geriatric Cardiovascular Case Studies,” May 2012
  • “90 is the New 60: Geriatric Cardiovascular Case Studies,” Greater Washington Area Chapter Spotlight on Advanced Practice Nursing, March 2014
  • “Cardiac Medications and the Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System,” “90 is the new 60: Geriatric Cardiovascular Case Studies” and “The ABCs of Acute PE,” Greater Washington Area Chapter Spotlight on Critical Care, November 2013

Key Professional Activities outside AACN, 2012 - present

Includes involvement with other professional organizations, teaching and/or speaking engagements

  • Chair and speaker, Annual Interdisciplinary Cardiovascular Grand Rounds, MedStar Montgomery Medical Center, Olney, Maryland, 2005-present
  • “90 is the New 60: Geriatric Cardiovascular Case Studies” and “Pulmonary Embolism,” 30th Annual Townsend Cardiovascular Conference, Wesley Medical Center, Wichita, Kansas, September 2015
  • Henry K. Heart failure. In Baird M, ed. Manual of Critical Care Nursing. 7th ed. Elsevier; 2015.
  • Henry, K. Cardiomyopathy. In Baird M, ed. Manual of Critical Care Nursing. 7th ed. Elsevier; 2015.
  • “Cardiac Medications and the Renin Angiotensin Aldosterone System,” Winchester Medical Center Cardiovascular Conference, Winchester, Virginia, April 2012

Issues Statement

With the Healthy Work Environments initiative, AACN has worked to enhance the environment in which critical care nurses practice. These standards foster excellence in critical care nursing and among the interdisciplinary team. Critical care nurses face increasing demands on their time at the bedside, from charting in the electronic medical record, to provision of patient education, to a focus on optimal customer service. An area that I believe requires more focus is the concept of “finding balance.” In finding balance, we support our critical care team to deliver a high standard of care and meet designated metrics, while helping them to remain healthy, refreshed and invigorated about their practice. Developing a culture that promotes the physical and mental well-being of our staff and leaders is an essential facet of a healthy work environment.

The concept of finding balance can be applied at many levels. It includes developing a unit culture that ensures staff members take breaks for eating and “decompressing” rather than working straight through their shift to meet the demands of ICU care. More broadly, it includes helping staff to strike a balance between clinical practice, professional development, physical and mental well-being, and personal demands. Supporting employee wellness through health initiatives is another key component of this concept. So many of our colleagues struggle with chronic health problems such as hypertension, obesity or diabetes; problems that put them at risk for other serious illness. These concepts are less concrete than some of the other aspects of a healthy work environment but require significant attention to ensure job satisfaction at the individual level and a work environment that is truly “healthy” at the organizational level. In supporting the health of our critical care team, we can better support the health and well-being of our patients and their families.

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