RES8 - Decreasing Sepsis Mortality Rates With an Early Detection Computerized Auto-alert System
Primary Author: Darlene Baker
Co-Author(s): Casmen Oglesby
Institution: Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, AR
Contact Email: dbaker@astate.edu
   
Purpose: The Purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of an early detection computerized auto-alert monitoring system compared to a non-computerized detection system in adult hospitalized patients. The study utilized the physiological parameters advocated for early sepsis screening by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) which research has shown decreases sepsis mortality rates.
Background/Significance: Sepsis affects approximately 750,000 people yearly with 200,000 of those patients dying, costing the United States healthcare system over $16.7 billion per year. Sepsis is the leading cause of death in non-coronary critical care units, and the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. Early detection has been proven to have positive outcomes for patients due to early intervention, which can prevent hypoperfusion and organ dysfunction.
Methods: This is a quasiexperimental study utilizing a convenience sample of adult non-pregnant participants 18 years or older hospitalized within a 248 bed comprehensive metro healthcare hospital in the midsouth. The participant’s selection criteria were based upon the physiological parameters currently recommended by the SSC. A system was developed by the quality improvement coordinator and information technology to send an auto-alert via pager and e-mail when at least two of the criteria for suspicion of infection and at least one organ dysfunction criteria (per SSC parameters) were charted within the computerized documentation system via hospital personnel. The page is sent to the Medical Response Team (MRT) and the Patient Care Coordinator (PCC) of the medical-surgical floors. In addition, the information is e-mailed to the quality assurance coordinator and the chief medical officer.
Results: An independent t test was used to evaluate the data for this study. Thirty participants in the computerized auto-alert detection system study were compared with 28 participants in a previous non-computerized detection system study. The sepsis mortality was 36.7% (11 out of 30) for the computerized auto-alert detection system study compared to 50% (14 out of 28) for the non-computerized detection system study (t=.031, p=.05). A Levene’s test was conducted (Sig. =.818, p>.05) proving the assumption of homogeneity of variance for the two groups.
Conclusions: Based upon the analysis data, there is a significant difference in the sepsis mortality rate of patients screened using an early detection computerized auto-alert monitoring system compared to a non-computerized detection system in adult hospitalized patients involving the use of the physiological parameters advocated for early sepsis screening by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign.
   
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