TRANSITIONS – November 2011

Events in the lives of members and friends in the AACN community

 
 

Shelly Buck-Turner, chief nurse executive and vice president, Patient Care, Bon Secours St. Francis Medical Center, Midlothian, Va.; Peggy Gordin, vice president, Patient Care Services, St. Louis Children’s Hospital; Pamela Jeffries, associate dean, Academic Affairs, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore; Patricia Morton, professor and associate dean, Academic Affairs, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, an AACN member since 1978 and past member of the AACN board of directors; and Colleen Swartz, chief nurse executive, University of Kentucky HealthCare, Lexington, were selected for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Nurse Fellows program.

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The University of Alabama School of Nursing, Birmingham, names Sandra Dunbar — Charles Howard Candler professor of cardiovascular nursing, associate dean for academic advancement, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, past AACN president and recipient of the 2005 AACN Distinguished Research Lectureship — its 2011 Distinguished Alumni.

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Pam Johnson, nurse educator, Mayo Clinic Health System, Eau Claire, Wis., is the first recipient of the annual Joan Heimler Legacy of Life Scholarship Award from the BloodCenter of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

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Janice Linton, clinical nurse IV, Holy Cross Hospital, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., is promoted to assistant nurse manager in the cardiovascular ICU.

Divina Sirokie, clinical nurse IV, Holy Cross Hospital, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., receives the hospital’s “Expert Nurse Clinician” Magnet Award in recognition of her clinical expertise.

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Karin Smith, staff nurse, Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Ocean Springs Hospital, Miss., earned a Master of Science in Nursing Education from The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City.

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Max Harry Weil, considered the father of the critical care movement, died at his home in California at the age of 84. Among his many pioneering achievements, which changed healthcare as we know it, Weil established the first critical care unit, introduced computerized patient monitors, invented many medical devices and treatments, and wrote countless articles and books. Weil was on the faculty of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, from 1958 to 1981 and served as founding president of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, Mount Prospect, Ill. A world-class clinician, educator and researcher, he also co-founded the Weil Institute of Critical Care Medicine, a nonprofit research and education center in Rancho Mirage, Calif.

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