Critical Care Newsline — January 22, 2009

Critical Care Newline Home
 


Critical Care Newsline, the electronic newsletter from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, contains information selected just for you by AACN’s clinical practice experts. In each issue, you’ll find links to resources, research abstracts (individual sites may require registration and a fee to access complete articles) and Web sites that will keep you informed on issues affecting nurses and the nursing profession.

Jan. 22, 2009

********************************************.
1. CALL FOR RESPONSE: Take AACN’s Web Site User Survey
2. EVIDENCE Surgical Safety Checklist Decreases Deaths and Complications
3. EVIDENCE Surviving Cardiac Arrest: Patients Fare Better in Large, High-volume Hospitals
4. ADVISORY Reducing Bar-Code Medication Administration Errors
5. RESOURCE: This CHAIN Links to Emerging Therapies
6. EVIDENCE Thwart Colds; Get Your ZZZZZs
7. NEWS TRENDS Paper and Pencil Certification Exams Application Deadline Just Around the Corner
8. Clinical Practice Resources
9. AACN Resources
************************************************

1. CALL FOR RESPONSE: Take AACN’s Web Site User Survey
If you use AACN’s Web site, you already know we’ve made many changes to our content and format in response to your feedback. Now that our site has been revamped, we’d like your input. Please take a few minutes to complete the 2009 AACN Web site user survey. Your responses will help us further enhance AACN’s online presence. The deadline is Feb. 5.

2. EVIDENCE Surgical Safety Checklist Decreases Deaths and Complications
By reading through a list of procedures aloud and checking them off before and after an operation, hospital surgical teams reduced patient complications by more than one-third, according to a study led by researchers from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Harvard School of Public Health. Researchers also found when surgical teams in low-income countries used the checklist, in-hospital deaths from complications decreased by half. Developed by an international group of leading surgeons, nurses, anesthesiologists and patient safety experts, the checklist is part of the WHO’s “Safe Surgery Saves Lives” initiative to improve communications among surgical team members during surgery and to increase consistent use of proven standards of surgical care in order to reduce preventable complications and mortality. “These initial and very positive results will be a huge stimulus for all countries to consider making this type of safety checklist approach a regular aspect of surgical care,” the authors noted. “With approximately 234 million surgeries performed each year worldwide, we owe it to our patients to look at every opportunity to prevent complications.” To download the checklist or find out more about the Safe Surgery initiative, click here.

3. EVIDENCE Surviving Cardiac Arrest: Patients Fare Better in Large, High-volume Hospitals
Patients in large, urban and teaching hospitals are more likely to survive cardiac arrest compared to those in small, often rural, non-academic hospitals, according to a recent study. The findings points to a need to explore the development of specialized, regional post-cardiac arrest care centers modeled after those that treat serious trauma patients, according to the authors. "There are two possible implications: Either we need to get everyone up to speed on how to optimize survival, or we need to selectively transfer patients to hospitals that have expertise in the post-arrest period,” the researchers reported, adding that further study of post-cardiac arrest care among these large, urban, and teaching hospitals will be crucial in mapping strategies that maximize a patient's chances to be discharged without the neurological deficits that often plague cardiac arrest survivors.

4. ADVISORY Reducing Bar-Code Medication Administration Errors
Bar-code medication administration (BCMA) systems can improve medication safety by verifying that the right drug is being administered to the right patient. In fact, studies have shown that BCMA technology can reduce medication errors by 65% to 86%. But BCMA technology is not failsafe; mistakes may result from failures to use the technology appropriately, employing workarounds or overriding alerts, disruptions in the medication administration process, and dispensing errors that arise in the pharmacy. To overcome these problems, practitioners should review BCMA logs to evaluate overrides and identify system weaknesses; then monitor and measure compliance with the technology to identify and remove any barriers to its appropriate use.

5. RESOURCE: This CHAIN Links to Emerging Therapies
The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has launched Clinician-Consumer Health Advisory Information Network (CHAIN), a Web site that offers advice on emerging medical therapies. The site connects users to new information about evidence-based medicine gathered from AHRQ's Centers for Education and Research on Therapeutics. Drawing on Internet resources, CHAIN provides timely and practical information to health-care professionals, patients, family members, medical faculty, and others about emerging issues concerning the safe and effective use of drugs, devices and biological products.

6. EVIDENCE Thwart Colds; Get Your ZZZZZs
Exposure to rhinovirus is more likely to lead to the development of a cold in people who have less than seven hours' sleep each night compared to their better-rested counterparts, according to a recent study. Study participants recorded their sleep habits for 14 days before they were quarantined and exposed to a rhinovirus. They were then observed for signs of a common cold. Those who slept less than seven hours were 2.94 times more likely to develop a cold after exposure to rhinovirus. Participants with less than 92 percent sleep efficiency (percentage of time actually in bed asleep) were 5.5 times more likely to develop a cold than those with sleep efficiency of 98 percent or above, the researchers reported. "These relationships could not be explained by differences in pre-challenge virus-specific antibody titers, demographics, season of the year, body mass, socioeconomic status, psychological variables or health practices," the authors concluded.

7. NEWS TRENDS Paper and Pencil Certification Exams Application Deadline Just Around the Corner
Is 2009 the year for you to enhance your skills and knowledge with a new credential? Here’s the perfect opportunity: Paper and pencil exams for the CCRN, PCCN, CCNS, ACNPC, CMC, CSC, and CNML will be given at the spring Trends conference in Philadelphia on March 27, 2009. The deadline to submit Trends exam applications to AACN is Feb. 6, 2009.

8. Clinical Practice Resources

EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE
Medication Administration Through Enteral Feeding Tubes

Creative Education for Rapid Response Team Implementation

Patient Satisfaction: How Do Qualitative Comments Relate to Quantitative Scores on a Satisfaction Survey?

The Front Line of Patient Safety: Staff Nurses and Rapid Response Team Calls

GUIDELINES
Adult Weight Management Evidence-based Nutrition Practice

Critical Illness Evidence-based Nutrition Practice

Pediatric Weight Management Evidence-based Nutrition Practice

PATIENT SAFETY ISSUES
Topical Anesthetics: Public Health Advisory Issued Regarding Serious Hazards of Using Skin Numbing Products

*****************************************************************************************
If you do not wish to receive e-mail updates from AACN, please reply to
unsubscribe@aacn.org

Do you have a comment, question or story idea for the Critical Care Newsline? Send your email to enewsletter@aacn.org

UPDATE YOUR OWN INFORMATION ONLINE

Did you know you can update your demographic profile, including your e-mail address, online? Simply log in using your membership or customer identification number. Your default password is the first 15 letters of your last name. Go to: http://www.aacn.org/DM/CustomerProfile/UpdateCustomerProfile.aspx

*****************************************************************************************